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Author Topic: After All These Years...  (Read 4712 times)

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June 07, 2013, 07:09:12 AM
Reply #20

varza

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Well, Hermione could be Spirit - a fifth element some people claim exist. Course there is McGonagall. What about the Chakras?

You could look at some of the negative aspects of the women as the flip of the positive female forces. Petunia was the negative to Lily. Umbridge the opposite of Hermione (she focused on breaking his spirit while Hermione was a calming uplifting force), Bellatrix the opposite of Ginny (firey but in a damaging way), and so on. Even Romilda Vane as the opposite of Luna.

Post Merge: June 07, 2013, 07:10:37 AM
As to the movies, one such fun(?) fact is that there's a reason why we only see Madam Hooch in the PS/SS movie. Zoë Wanamaker, who plays the part, refused as the only actor or actress to sign for both PS/SS and COS. She was publicly advocating that actors should never sign for a sequel before the first installment was made, because then any box office success of the first movie could be used as an argument for better pay on the second installment. Sticking to her point of view, she only signed for PS/SS. Of course, WB chose to not include her in the rest of the movies instead... The only thing is that I don't remember the source for this info, and it drives me mad... Do any of you remember this and know where we found out about it?  :ron:
I remember and I remember that was one of the reasons she wasn't resigned because she demanded a bigger paycheck and a bigger part after the first movie came out. But I don't remember the source. This was before everything was on the internet.
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June 14, 2013, 12:14:46 AM
Reply #21

paint it Black

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I've been re-reading PoA, and taking another look at Crookshanks.  On this reading, I thought, Of course, Hermione intends to buy an owl, but is instantly attracted to a ginger, rough-around-the-edges cat, and gets him instead.   :ron:  And is it a coincidence that Crookshanks eats spiders?  Nice of Hermione to get a cat that removes the common room of Ron's least-liked creature.  :aragog:

I was also reminded that Crookshanks and Scabbers first met right there in the Magical Menagerie, when Crookshanks jumped on Ron's head in an attempt to get at Scabbers.  So later, when Padfoot  :pawprint: meets Crookshanks, he has found the perfect being to assist him.  Crookshanks of all creatures would know already that something was not right about that particular rat, and would be more likely to agree to assist Padfoot in getting rid of him.  Jo really knows how to establish connections between her characters, even the non-human ones!   :owlso:

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July 01, 2013, 09:43:58 AM
Reply #22

varza

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Oh I like that connection!!! I never thought about connecting Crookshanks to Ron!

Question has been on my mind lately. Has Rowling ever said if there was an inspiration for Dumbledore? I was watching Fry & Laurie the other day and it dawned on me that Stephen Fry (who narrates the british audio version) seems a bit Dumbledorish. Crooked nose, twinkle in his eye, gay but no one really realizes it, loved by the masses (voted by Parliament as their choice for the Doctor), incredibly intelligent, even has a tone that makes people listen, as well as a love of life. But at the same time has a dark past. AND has the large crooked nose! I can just imagine him in the purple robes eating bertie bots!

Or is it just me? And I really want him to play DD if they ever remake it or take it to BBC.

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September 02, 2013, 04:52:40 PM
Reply #23

HealerOne

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Very interesting thought varza. Steven Fry might be a very good DD! However as best as I could ascertain from past interviews, JKR has never said he is based on anyone in particular. However she did say in a 2005 CoS DVD interview that "Dumbledore often speaks for me." So his wisdom seems to come from her.

Now I came over here to say I had another 'ah-ha moment' when listening to the DH DVD this morning. In the graveyard scene Hermione and Harry come upon Arrianna's gravestone on which an epitaph has engraved - Matthew 6:21 from the Christian Bible: "Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also." My goodness, I always thought that this verse was in regards to DD himself saying that his heart was with his sister and mother, because they were his treasures. Someone else said that this verse could also refer to Ron's experience with the Deluminator. Clicking it took him to where the treasure of his heart was. But suddenly this morning it occurred to me that this verse could also be pointing out that where Harry's heart is (Hogwarts) - is where the 'treasure' (Voldemort's Horcrux) is.  It's amazing how well this verse fits into the story and can be interpreted in so many ways.  It just makes me admire JKR even more for her ability to get so much meaning out of one quote!
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September 02, 2013, 09:29:13 PM
Reply #24

Evreka

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In the graveyard scene Hermione and Harry come upon Arrianna's gravestone on which an epitaph has engraved - Matthew 6:21 from the Christian Bible: "Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also." ...  It's amazing how well this verse fits into the story and can be interpreted in so many ways.  It just makes me admire JKR even more for her ability to get so much meaning out of one quote!
It is also possible to turn this around slightly, and be equally amazed at Jo writing books in such a clever way, that fans can get so many different interpretations out of a single quote!  :fredgeorge:
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September 03, 2013, 02:05:26 AM
Reply #25

HealerOne

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In the graveyard scene Hermione and Harry come upon Arrianna's gravestone on which an epitaph has engraved - Matthew 6:21 from the Christian Bible: "Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also." ...  It's amazing how well this verse fits into the story and can be interpreted in so many ways.  It just makes me admire JKR even more for her ability to get so much meaning out of one quote!
It is also possible to turn this around slightly, and be equally amazed at Jo writing books in such a clever way, that fans can get so many different interpretations out of a single quote!  :fredgeorge:
I'm curious Evreka, were you saying that you saw a different interpretation? I'd love to know what your thoughts were on reading on this epitaph. There just seems to be a lot of ways to look at this.:sherlock:
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September 03, 2013, 06:27:21 PM
Reply #26

siena

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What I thought of first was the Dumbledore - Grindelwald - Dumbledore's family - drama. Dumbledore didn't realise until it was too late that his fascination for Grindelwald was more in the nature of infatuation rather than love, and that is real heart lay with his real treasure - his family.

The next thing I thought of was that Hermione reads out the verse in that graveyard scene. In G0F, Hermione names Ron her treasurer (of her SPEW foundation, but really more of her heart I think ... ;). It implies that her heart lies with Ron - where her treasure is.
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March 22, 2014, 05:51:50 PM
Reply #27

HealerOne

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:hermioneread: Ok I know that it's been a long time since I have posted here but I came across something in my reading of the novel LONDON by Edward Rutherfurd that hit me between the eyes and I had to post here.

The word WIZENGAMOT - we have come to understand is a council of many old and wise wizards that is part of the MoM in England. I assumed that JKR made up that word based on Wizen = either for wizards or wizen as in old wise men and gemot = (in Anglo-Saxon England) a legislative or judicial assembly. So when I came across the word WITAN in the London novel, I used my handy Kindle dictionary to define it and this is what came up: "Witan – another term for WITENAGEMOT representing the OLD ENGLISH plural of wita ‘wise man’ ". And when I looked up in the Free Dictionary.com the meaning of that: "Witenagemot -noun Early English History. The assembly of the witan; the national council attended by the king, aldermen, bishops, and nobles.". 

So the word is sort of made up, but based on a true word that has a hefty meaning to English culture! One more amazing little thing that JKR put into her books to merge the real and fantasy worlds! Just goes to show that her research had to have been quite extensive!
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March 22, 2014, 06:13:26 PM
Reply #28

paint it Black

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.... One more amazing little thing that JKR put into her books to merge the real and fantasy worlds! Just goes to show that her research had to have been quite extensive!

It is staggering to think how large a brain and an imagination JK Rowling possesses!  :hermioneread:


I had an AHA! moment the other day that I am rather embarrassed to admit, since the rest of you probably picked this up on your very first reading of PS/SS.  I thought to myself, Why are there winged boars of all things at the entrance to Hogwarts?  Then,  :lightbulb:!  If (before you knew of HP) someone had asked you if there could be such a thing as a boarding school for wizards, could you not have said, When pigs fly!  ;D

Ok, you can continue being unimpressed now.   :ashamed:

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March 23, 2014, 04:24:17 PM
Reply #29

Evreka

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The word WIZENGAMOT - we have come to understand is a council of many old and wise wizards that is part of the MoM in England. .... "Witan – another term for WITENAGEMOT representing the OLD ENGLISH plural of wita ‘wise man’ ". And when I looked up in the Free Dictionary.com the meaning of that: "Witenagemot -noun Early English History. The assembly of the witan; the national council attended by the king, aldermen, bishops, and nobles.".  ...
:thumbup: Thanks for sharing your discovery, I've never heard of the WITENAGEMOT. You're right, it adds even more depth and understanding to the WIZENGAMOT! I really love  :hearts: how Jo plays with words; their origins, meanings and sometimes their history!   :harry:


I had an AHA! moment the other day ...  I thought to myself, Why are there winged boars of all things at the entrance to Hogwarts?  Then,  :lightbulb:!  If (before you knew of HP) someone had asked you if there could be such a thing as a boarding school for wizards, could you not have said, When pigs fly!  ;D

Ok, you can continue being unimpressed now. ...
Far from, I've always wondered the same; although I assumed the winged boar was a common magical/wizard/witch/myth symbol of some sort, seeing as many other things in HP can be associated with legends or old beliefs found in folklore, myth, legends, history or fairy tales, although mostly the associations have been tweaked a bit first.

Further, as English is not my first language, I'd never associate the winged boars with that expression. Though I know its meaning (in effect never), it just wouldn't cross my mind on its own....

HOWEVER....

Now that you mention it, your explanation becomes even more probable, due to the fact that about midway through the series, we come by another Pig that flies:hedwigpig: Ron's owl!!!   :mcgonagall2:  Although, his name has always seemed riddiculous to me (due to the literal being of a pig), I haven't until now, this minute, reading your post, grasped the full extension of just HOW outrageously funny it really is!!!  :fredgeorge:  :fredgeorge: Now, there's one expression the Weasleys can't ever use again....   :lol:
« Last Edit: March 23, 2014, 04:27:36 PM by Evreka »
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August 23, 2014, 01:48:14 AM
Reply #30

HealerOne

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I cannot believe that after so many years have past since Deathly Hallows came out, and we have discussed to death 'the mirror phenomenon' of book 1&7, 2&6, 3&5 ... that I just realized something :lightbulb: (A real ah-ha moment!) that confirms that concept of JKR writing in things that 'mirrored' things she wrote in the twin book. Can you guess what I am talking about?  :hmm: Of course MIRRORS! (I mean really, how much of a dunce am I?) In Book One we meet up with a very important mirror - the Mirror of Erised  with the amazing magical ability to show the person looking at it what their heart desired. In Book Seven - we find out about Sirius's mirrors - with the amazing ability to connect the gazer into them, to those they want to see the most. Sigh, I don't know why I never put that together before ... especially as we have discussed those things so much! Guess it just goes to show how much symbolism and thought JKR put into the books, that we can still uncover things that speak to her careful planning of the books even now!
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February 15, 2015, 11:13:42 PM
Reply #31

paint it Black

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I was thinking today about the warning that Arthur gave to Harry on the train platform on 1 Sept. in POA:

Quote
'Harry, swear to me you won't go looking for Black.'

Harry stared.  'What?'

There was a loud whistle.  Guards were walking along the train, slamming all the doors shut.

'Promise me, Harry,' said Mr Weasley, talking more quickly still, 'that whatever happens--'

'Why would I go looking for someone who wants to kill me?' said Harry blankly.

'Swear to me that whatever you might hear--'

Fortunately for all, it worked out well that Harry and Hermione ignored this advice at the end of POA, and were able to find Sirius and help him escape to safety.  One wonders though if Arthur's warning could really could have been more of a foreshadowing to OotP; "...whatever you might hear...." :'( If only Harry had not gone after Sirius then (or, to where he thought Sirius would be), things would have turned out quite differently.

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February 21, 2015, 04:44:15 PM
Reply #32

roonwit

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I was thinking today about the warning that Arthur gave to Harry on the train platform on 1 Sept. in POA:

Quote
'Harry, swear to me you won't go looking for Black.'

Harry stared.  'What?'

There was a loud whistle.  Guards were walking along the train, slamming all the doors shut.

'Promise me, Harry,' said Mr Weasley, talking more quickly still, 'that whatever happens--'

'Why would I go looking for someone who wants to kill me?' said Harry blankly.

'Swear to me that whatever you might hear--'

Fortunately for all, it worked out well that Harry and Hermione ignored this advice at the end of POA, and were able to find Sirius and help him escape to safety.  One wonders though if Arthur's warning could really could have been more of a foreshadowing to OotP; "...whatever you might hear...." :'( If only Harry had not gone after Sirius then (or, to where he thought Sirius would be), things would have turned out quite differently.
Though he didn't actually go looking for Sirius as far as I remember. He certainly felt like it, particularly after hearing Sirius' supposed involvement in his parents' deaths, but it was Sirius who found them and kidnapped Ron for his rat. Harry and Hermione followed to try to rescue Ron, but they only found out the dog was Sirius when they reached the Shack.
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March 01, 2015, 07:34:42 PM
Reply #33

Evreka

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I was thinking today about the warning that Arthur gave to Harry on the train platform on 1 Sept. in POA:

Quote
'Harry, swear to me you won't go looking for Black.' ...
'Promise me, Harry,' said Mr Weasley, talking more quickly still, 'that whatever happens--' ...
'Swear to me that whatever you might hear--'
... One wonders though if Arthur's warning could really could have been more of a foreshadowing to OotP; "...whatever you might hear...." :'( If only Harry had not gone after Sirius then (or, to where he thought Sirius would be), things would have turned out quite differently.
This is an interesting thought, it does work, from the readers horizon, to remember this when it comes to the OOP "rescue" mission.  :madeye:

It's hard to say whether that was intended or not, but it's fun regardless.  :hermioneread:
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March 04, 2015, 12:19:55 AM
Reply #34

paint it Black

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I was thinking today about the warning that Arthur gave to Harry on the train platform on 1 Sept. in POA:

Quote
'Harry, swear to me you won't go looking for Black.'

Harry stared.  'What?'

There was a loud whistle.  Guards were walking along the train, slamming all the doors shut.

'Promise me, Harry,' said Mr Weasley, talking more quickly still, 'that whatever happens--'

'Why would I go looking for someone who wants to kill me?' said Harry blankly.

'Swear to me that whatever you might hear--'

Fortunately for all, it worked out well that Harry and Hermione ignored this advice at the end of POA, and were able to find Sirius and help him escape to safety.  One wonders though if Arthur's warning could really could have been more of a foreshadowing to OotP; "...whatever you might hear...." :'( If only Harry had not gone after Sirius then (or, to where he thought Sirius would be), things would have turned out quite differently.
Though he didn't actually go looking for Sirius as far as I remember. He certainly felt like it, particularly after hearing Sirius' supposed involvement in his parents' deaths, but it was Sirius who found them and kidnapped Ron for his rat. Harry and Hermione followed to try to rescue Ron, but they only found out the dog was Sirius when they reached the Shack.

My apologies; I really need to be less obtuse sometimes. :ashamed: What I was really refering to when I said that "Harry and Hermione ignored this advice" was when they went looking for Sirius in Prof. Flitwick's office, after Dumbledore had (strongly ::) ) hinted that they should use the time-turner.  Thankfully, more that one innocent life was saved that night!  :stars:

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March 07, 2015, 08:03:32 PM
Reply #35

roonwit

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My apologies; I really need to be less obtuse sometimes. :ashamed: What I was really refering to when I said that "Harry and Hermione ignored this advice" was when they went looking for Sirius in Prof. Flitwick's office, after Dumbledore had (strongly ::) ) hinted that they should use the time-turner.  Thankfully, more that one innocent life was saved that night!  :stars:
I would argue that Harry and Hermione aren't really going looking for Sirius then because they know exactly where he is! But you are right that it is an interesting about turn of the right thing to do.
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