August 17, 2018, 07:56:45 PM

Author Topic: What Are You Reading?  (Read 41351 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

February 10, 2013, 12:31:55 AM
Reply #40

HealerOne

  • Staffer
  • *****
  • Posts: 914
    • Chasing the Tale
I am currently racing through London, the Novel, by Edward Rutherford. I enjoyed his novel about New York a few years back. I am finding London a quick way to get an overview of English history--which I know only superficially--by following the lives of the descendants of some very early residents of the area.
Funny you should mention that book (London). I had looked at it as a possible read sometime back, but didn't buy it. Then today I saw that the author, Edward Rutherfurd, is coming out with a new novel titled Paris. according to Amazon (US) it will be available towards the end of April. Sigh another few books to put on my wish list!

Today I just got done with the autobiography of Jane Lynch, Happy Accidents - a quick so-so read. Most people would recognize her as Sue Sylvester on Glee!. Now I am diving into Olive Kitteridge, by Elizabeth Strout.

I am a member of Goodreads but I totally forget to add what I have read. I really should keep track...
Logged
February 10, 2013, 02:14:23 AM
Reply #41

Marielle

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 101
I am reading a highly recommended YA book (Unwind by Neal Shusterman) and so far it is really good, I hope it continues that way  :D
Logged
February 10, 2013, 07:09:21 AM
Reply #42

RiverSpirit

  • You can count on me!
  • Forum Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 554
  • Maroon to the Bone
Even though I have an extensive "to read" list I have started "Where Angels Fear to Tread" by E M Forster. It is the first classic I have read in a long time and I stumbled across it quite by accident. I am so pleased I did.
  
Logged
February 10, 2013, 08:20:19 PM
Reply #43

varza

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 202
    • Varzaland
I finished The Fault in Our Stars a few days ago and cried buckets. I knew what was going to happen, given the subject matter of the book, but I still got very emotional over it.

I tend to become incredibly geeky over history, especially British Monarchy, so I've been following the discovery and subsequent identification of the skeleton of King Richard III with great interest. I've never really known too much about him, apart from him being blamed for the disappearance and possible murder of his nephews, 'the Princes in the Tower', so I decided to read up on him. So now I'm reading Richard III: The Young King To Be by Josephine Wilkinson.
I trawled Amazon looking for as unbiased a book on him as I could find (I want to make up my own mind on him, without thinking of Shakespeare's play or Tudor propaganda) and this seemed to be the best one. So far, so good.
I love reading about British history as well. The book that got me started was Sunne of Splendor. Its not an unbiased look at Richard the III but it takes the other view - that he wasn't evil at all but a loyal brother and uncle. It was really good. When my hubs and I went to England a few years ago we took a day and hiked our way to Middleham Castle (its not easy to get to at all because its not a hot tourist spot) and it was awesome to see in person. Richard III is like Anne Boylen for me - so much mystery surrounds the two of them and both have been victims of some serious propaganda. They are also the ones who made me fall in love with history and why I am getting a history minor.

I'm still working on Dune - its been about 15 years since I read the series and wow! I have completely forgotten so much its like I never read it before. Not that I am reading slow just almost all my reading time is being taken up with school work.
I am everywhere....
Logged
February 12, 2013, 05:03:04 PM
Reply #44

SnapesSister

  • Forum Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 111
I love reading about British history as well. The book that got me started was Sunne of Splendor. Its not an unbiased look at Richard the III but it takes the other view - that he wasn't evil at all but a loyal brother and uncle. It was really good. When my hubs and I went to England a few years ago we took a day and hiked our way to Middleham Castle (its not easy to get to at all because its not a hot tourist spot) and it was awesome to see in person. Richard III is like Anne Boylen for me - so much mystery surrounds the two of them and both have been victims of some serious propaganda. They are also the ones who made me fall in love with history and why I am getting a history minor.

Ahh, I actually *squee'd* a little when I saw your post, varza, because I am actually reading Sunne in Splendour now, and I just cannot put it down! It's lucky I'm reading it on Kindle, because at 900+ pages, it must be a little heavy, lol. In Kindle speak I'm 77% of the way through, so I've spent all my free time over the last few days racing through it. And you're right, it's an excellent read, and it's also making me want to go and visit Middleham Castle.
I kind of don't want to reach the end of the book, because, knowing the history, I know what's going to happen, and it's just so sad. *sigh*
Logged
February 14, 2013, 01:10:03 AM
Reply #45

Marielle

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 101
So I am finished reading Unwind by Neal Shusterman, and it was very very very good, in a creepy way. So if you are looking to read something that is good and intelligent and also make you think, this books is for you. It had been highly recommended and it didn't disappointed me at all, so I am recommending it in return.  :D

Another book that had been recommended, Don't Turn Around by Michelle Gagnon. I read it, it is fun and entertaining, but I got bugged by the computer jargon about hacking, that I think is completely false, like she just used some fancy programming talk to make it look like hacking. Ok I know nothing about hacking at all, but still, it all seems false to me, so it ended up being just an OK book for me.

Now I am finally on the third instalment of the Demon Cycle series (The Daylight War by Peter V. Brett that just came out yesterday  :) ) I was slightly disappointed by the second book, because it felt like another "first book", by having the whole background (from childhood to now) of another important characters being told to us, yet again. I hope in the third book we will finally see the story go forward, because I am really looking forward to see how all this will unfold. :)
Logged
February 15, 2013, 12:49:01 AM
Reply #46

paint it Black

  • Notorious Mass Murderer OR Innocent Singing Sensation
  • Forum Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 697
I finally killed Doctor Zhivago not too long ago  :yay: and have now started reading Life of Pi.  And yes, seeing the film did inspire me to read the book  :) (Life of Pi, that is, I still haven't seen Doctor Zhivago). 

Cuppa is discussing Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman.  Please join us!
Logged
February 15, 2013, 07:40:43 AM
Reply #47

varza

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 202
    • Varzaland
Ahh, I actually *squee'd* a little when I saw your post, varza, because I am actually reading Sunne in Splendour now, and I just cannot put it down! It's lucky I'm reading it on Kindle, because at 900+ pages, it must be a little heavy, lol. In Kindle speak I'm 77% of the way through, so I've spent all my free time over the last few days racing through it. And you're right, it's an excellent read, and it's also making me want to go and visit Middleham Castle.
I kind of don't want to reach the end of the book, because, knowing the history, I know what's going to happen, and it's just so sad. *sigh*
I know right! Unfortunately, I knew next to nothing about the history when I first read it except what I learned from Shakespeare's play.

Finished Dune - now onto Dune Messiah
I am everywhere....
Logged
February 18, 2013, 02:41:30 AM
Reply #48

ss19

  • DS's resident Clever Clogs
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 590
I'm mildly embarrassed as I'm posting this, looking at everyone else's amazing reading accomplishment.... 

I just recently read The Lord of the Rings and it literally took me about two and a half years to finish.  It wasn't an easy read for me and I only managed to finish it with a lot of help and encouragement from a friend.  I also tried a couple of other books in that time span but both times gave up and stopped reading after 3 or 4 chapters.  Those two books were Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, and The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens.

Right now I'm reading Oliver Twist.  Two friends recommended it as an easier introduction to Charles Dickens' works after I couldn't get into The Old Curiosity Shop a while back.  I am now 5 chapters in and so far so good.
Logged
February 18, 2013, 07:09:52 AM
Reply #49

varza

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 202
    • Varzaland
One of the things I have found about Tolkien - he is difficult and I am shocked his books are considered kids books! It took me 5 tries to read the Hobbit! And I haven't even finished Fellowship yet and I first started it 10 years ago. I gave up... which is sad!

But P&P - that book I love! I have read it so many times...
I am everywhere....
Logged
February 18, 2013, 07:24:05 AM
Reply #50

Hermione P

  • *****
  • Posts: 208
    • My Tumblr page
Just started Red Scarf Girl, a YA memoir of the Cultural Revolution, by Ji-li Jiang. I like reading memoirs because it's history from a personal point of view.

I just recently read The Lord of the Rings and it literally took me about two and a half years to finish.  It wasn't an easy read for me and I only managed to finish it with a lot of help and encouragement from a friend.

For the Lord of the Rings trilogy, I read each book only after I had watched the movie. I had not heard of Tolkien at all before the movies. I watched the first movie at 13 with a friend, because I wanted to watch the first Potter movie but she had already seen it.

I still haven't gotten round to buying the third book yet, and all 3 books must be the same edition, or the index at the end of the third book can't be used.
Logged
February 19, 2013, 03:41:54 PM
Reply #51

HealerOne

  • Staffer
  • *****
  • Posts: 914
    • Chasing the Tale
Funny you should talk about The Lord of the Rings Trilogy ... I remember wading through them some time ago and had a terrible time of it! I constantly was having difficulty keeping track of which character was which! It's definitely a read that one has to slog through. That said - I loved The Hobbit . It was a more straight forward read and that is why I thought I would love the Rings Trilogy, but was sadly mistaken.

I am almost done with Olive Kitteridge. I'm finding it a strange read - sometimes so intense and sad I have to stop after each chapter to catch my breath. I hope to finish it by tomorrow because a friend wants to borrow it. I just hope I like the ending ...
Logged
February 20, 2013, 12:02:55 AM
Reply #52

Misssyblantsybil

  • *****
  • Posts: 42
Just finished two books by Lindsay Faye, Dust and Shadows, and Gods of Gotham, both historical fiction about crime solving. The first is about how Sherlock Holmes actually solved the Ripper murders. Charmingly, written in the style of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Why haven't I come across that particular plot idea before? It is such a great one!

Agree about Tolkien. The Hobbit was a fun read, but the Trilogy was more of a slog:  too many creatures, battle after battle, lots of characters to keep straight. Not to mention the different languages, songs and poems.  The movies brought the Trilogy all to life better for me than the books.
Logged
February 20, 2013, 02:38:38 AM
Reply #53

Hermione P

  • *****
  • Posts: 208
    • My Tumblr page
Read Miss Chopsticks by Xinran, about 3 sisters from a Chinese village going to Nanjing to work. It's originally in Chinese, and translated into English by a British lady. It's quite interesting to read Chinese characters saying British phrases like "bloody hell" (though for non-Chinese literature translated into Chinese, somehow I don't it strange when the colloquial phrases and words in the original are translated into their Chinese equivalents).

Now I want to read the original Chinese text to appreciate it in its original flavour, but it's not in the local libraries and bookshops. No luck with the Taiwanese bookshop websites either. :(
Logged
February 21, 2013, 02:20:13 PM
Reply #54

Buckbeak 26

  • *****
  • Posts: 64
Since returning home from back surgery on November 17 2012, I have had quite a bunch of time on my hands to do quite a bit of reading. I've read "Nice Guys Finish Last", by Leo Durocher. He was a baseball player for several teams in the late 1920's, and 1930's. He also was a manager of a few teams as well. The stories are interesting but also boring to me. I read most of the book by wading my way through it, but also enjoyed some of the stories.

I also have read some crime novels by Michael McGarrity about New Mexico(specifically the Santa Fe area) and have enjoyed those as well.

Right now, I am reading "Blind Ambition" an autobiography of John Dean and his problems during the Watergate Crisis (from Richard Nixon's years as President of the United States in 1972-1974). I had to wade through the first 50 or so pages but have really gotten into it since Mr. Dean got to the part of the Watergate break-in.  It looks at Mr. Dean's dealings as counsel to President Nixon and how he dealt with the prosecution and some jail time for his part in the cover up.


 


Right now I'm reading Oliver Twist.  Two friends recommended it as an easier introduction to Charles Dickens' works after I couldn't get into The Old Curiosity Shop a while back.  I am now 5 chapters in and so far so good.

ss-19. I read Oliver Twist when I was a sophomore back in high school (in early 1984.)
It was very interesting. It also was very sad in parts but also a great read. I hope you enjoy it. :bravo:
« Last Edit: February 21, 2013, 03:26:08 PM by Hippogriff Lover »
Logged
February 21, 2013, 10:57:48 PM
Reply #55

paint it Black

  • Notorious Mass Murderer OR Innocent Singing Sensation
  • Forum Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 697
LOL HealerOne and Misssyblantysybil, the word "slog" is probably the one I hear most often when someone refers to the LOTR books!  ;D Whoever has read them is a braver reader than I; I'm not sure that I could stick it out through all those pages of descriptions of, well, everything.  ::) My family and I just watched the Trilogy films last week for the first time (haven't seen The Hobbit yet) and we enjoyed them, but by the end of the last one I don't think I could have sat through another battle scene.  :scared: I can only imagine that this feeling is amplified when one reads the books.  Clearly Tolkien has one high-quality imagination, though!

So, don't you feel at all embarrassed ss19, finishing LOTR is quite an achievement!  :bravo: And I barely made it through The Old Curiosity Shop myself; the trudging through the countryside got as weary for the readers as it did for the characters after a while.  Let us know if you enjoy Oliver Twist.  I've read a handful of Dickens' but this is one that I still have on my to-read list.

I will second varza's recommendation of Pride and Prejudice.  Maybe  if you've seen one (or more; you can't go wrong with a good Mr. Darcy ;)) of the film productions it would be easier to get into it if you'd like to try again someday.  I've read several Austens (not thinking that I'd read a second one after having read Emma; I guess I'm just too cynical about romance novels!), and in my opinion P&P is the most fun and accessible of the bunch.

As for me I'm about halfway through Life of Pi.  It's good, but so far I've enjoyed the film version a bit more than the book (probably because the film was so well done!).

Cuppa is discussing Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman.  Please join us!
Logged
February 22, 2013, 12:00:46 AM
Reply #56

kala_way

  • *****
  • Posts: 4
If you want to make it through LOTR with less pain try the audio books. The version I listened to was FANTASTIC. Many readers, sound effects, music--AMAZING!

Regarding Dickens, I've never been a fan. He's depressing and tedious. I've read Old Curiosity Shop, Oliver Twist, and Tale of Two Cities and the last is the only one I really enjoyed. Of course, Christmas Carol is fantastic--maybe he should have just done more short stories. :)

Life of Pi was good I thought. In parts it wandered a bit into illogical weirdness, but overall it was enjoyable. The movie was very well done.

I'm almost done with A Song of Ice and Fire, and boy has that been a slog. He needs an editor with a big fat red pen. If one more persons guts spill out or another 12 year old girl gets married I might scream.
Logged
February 24, 2013, 09:20:29 AM
Reply #57

Maraudingdon

  • *****
  • Posts: 131
    • Musings of a Penniless Writer
If you want to make it through LOTR with less pain try the audio books.

I'm almost done with A Song of Ice and Fire, and boy has that been a slog. He needs an editor with a big fat red pen. If one more persons guts spill out or another 12 year old girl gets married I might scream.

Shows how subjective opinions of novels can be because I think LotR and The Game of Thrones are perfect.

I am currently rereading The Hunger Games trilogy. A masterpiece in dystopian lit.
Logged
February 24, 2013, 12:18:09 PM
Reply #58

Kickassnoodle

  • You can't get any smarter than this
  • Forum Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 286
Shows how subjective opinions of novels can be because I think LotR and The Game of Thrones are perfect.
I do too! Admittedly, I've only read LotR once, but only because I figure I should read more books I've not read before, like Song of Ice and Fire - I'm about one third into Storm of Swords and it seems to be getting better and better with each book, even if also more frustrating, in the sense that hardly anything good ever happens. They do take forever to read, but that's part of their charm, at least to me. I like long 'old-times' stories :)
Logged
February 24, 2013, 06:50:58 PM
Reply #59

Evreka

  • Quibbling Queen
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1700
    • Try & Trix
Right now I'm reading Oliver Twist.  Two friends recommended it as an easier introduction to Charles Dickens' works after I couldn't get into The Old Curiosity Shop a while back.  I am now 5 chapters in and so far so good.
ss-19. I read Oliver Twist when I was a sophomore back in high school (in early 1984.)
It was very interesting. It also was very sad in parts but also a great read. I hope you enjoy it. :bravo:
I read Oliver Twist in school when I was approx 17 years old (quite awhile ago). I really loved it then, and was very fascinated by some characters "shades of grey". I think it was probably one of the first books I read where an author was truly exploring the grey areas of shadiness in characters. I guess it would be interesting to reread it now and compare it to Jo's take on shades of grey.  :madeye:


LOL HealerOne and Misssyblantysybil, the word "slog" is probably the one I hear most often when someone refers to the LOTR books!  ;D Whoever has read them is a braver reader than I; I'm not sure that I could stick it out through all those pages of descriptions of, well, everything.  ::) My family and I just watched the Trilogy films last week for the first time (haven't seen The Hobbit yet) and we enjoyed them, but by the end of the last one I don't think I could have sat through another battle scene.  :scared: I can only imagine that this feeling is amplified when one reads the books.  Clearly Tolkien has one high-quality imagination, though!
Granted, I haven't read these books either (The Hobbit included), since my teen years, but I remember them as an interesting read, once you got started on the trip and you got through a couple of pages on tobacco and other oddities.  :fredgeorge: As far as I remember it, I liked the LOTR trilogy above The Hobbit, which was the more boring of them. That said, I liked The Hobbit too.   :hermioneread: I've also read a few more of the books about Middle Earth and liked them.

I haven't seen the movie  The Hobbit yet either, but I actually think the battles in LOTR movie were much more upfront or deeper delved into than they were in the book. Or else I got more sensitive to that kind of violence and slaughter in the intervening years between reading and seeing LOTR, which is fully possible too.


I will second varza's recommendation of Pride and Prejudice
That makes three of us!  :bear:  Mrs Bennett can be quite as difficult to read as Lockhart, but the book on the whole is just great.   :mollyarthur:


Life of Pi - What kind of book (genre) is it?
« Last Edit: February 24, 2013, 07:08:28 PM by Evreka »
Logged