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Author Topic: What Are You Reading?  (Read 39244 times)

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January 16, 2016, 10:38:30 PM
Reply #400

Evreka

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Yesterday I finished Tell the Wolves I'm Home by Carol Rifka Brunt....  Has any of you read it?

I haven't, but it sounds like something I'd enjoy, so I'm putting it on my list.  Thanks!

I've had this on my list since the time of this post (15 months ago), and I am just now reading it.  I am enjoying it so far, Evreka, thanks for recommending it!  I'm finding the main character of June (and the era in which she is growing up) very relateable, and the story itself is starting to get quite compelling.  I have to say that the risks that June takes to meet up with a stranger make me a bit uneasy.  We as readers believe that this character she is meeting is an ok person, but if I were June's parent I'd be beyond panicked at what she's done.  It will be interesting to see what secrets are uncovered in these meetings by the end of the story.  :)
Yeah, I know. I wouldn't like that in real life either. And there are other things I might not be too happy with in real life either... but when I put that "aside", I found it fascinating. I hope it ends up as a better reading experience for you than Morton's first book...
« Last Edit: January 16, 2016, 10:40:17 PM by Evreka »
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January 17, 2016, 06:00:12 PM
Reply #401

HealerOne

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I am currently reading The Residence by Kate Brower. It is about The White House, the staff, and the residents - mostly in modern history. I have been fascinated by all the stories, as well as, the real devotion the staff pays to the House and to the residents. An excellent read.
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January 31, 2016, 12:00:03 AM
Reply #402

paint it Black

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Yesterday I finished Tell the Wolves I'm Home by Carol Rifka Brunt....  Has any of you read it?

I haven't, but it sounds like something I'd enjoy, so I'm putting it on my list.  Thanks!

I've had this on my list since the time of this post (15 months ago), and I am just now reading it.  I am enjoying it so far, Evreka, thanks for recommending it!  I'm finding the main character of June (and the era in which she is growing up) very relateable, and the story itself is starting to get quite compelling.  I have to say that the risks that June takes to meet up with a stranger make me a bit uneasy.  We as readers believe that this character she is meeting is an ok person, but if I were June's parent I'd be beyond panicked at what she's done.  It will be interesting to see what secrets are uncovered in these meetings by the end of the story.  :)
Yeah, I know. I wouldn't like that in real life either. And there are other things I might not be too happy with in real life either... but when I put that "aside", I found it fascinating. I hope it ends up as a better reading experience for you than Morton's first book...

I did really enjoy it overall Evreka; thanks!

After finishing that, I read Fortune Smiles by Adam Johnson, for a book club.  All I knew about this going in is that this book won the National Book Award last year, and that the same author won a Pulitzer for fiction for his novel The Orphan Master's Son.  Short story is not a format that I usually select to read, but I was game for it.  It turned out to be one of the best books I'd read in quite a while!  One of the stories even blew my mind a little bit; I went back and re-read it as soon as I finished it, and was even more mesmerized on the second read.  The stories are definitely a bit dark; they seem to mostly deal with central characters who have experienced some form of loss, and how they cope (or don't) with it.  The ideas are really original, though.  One story features characters that have escaped life in North Korea, but not all of them are happy about it.  Another features a pedophile trying to morally justify his actions to avoid offending, while not denying that he has these urges.  Another features a former East German prison guard who seems to have no guilt over his past duties.  Just really unique perspectives.  There are six stories in all, and not a bad one in the bunch.  Based on this book, I'll be likely to read more work from this author.

Now I'm reading a memoir called The House at Sugar Beach by Helene Cooper.  It also has a perspective unfamiliar to me: the author (now a journalist in Washington DC) was born and raised in Liberia.  In fact, her ancestors on both sides were some of Liberia's founding fathers, and she grew up with full knowledge of this, and with a significant amount of privilege.  Although I've yet to reach this part of the story, the book jacket tells me that the family had to flee Liberia in 1980 after a coup and attacks on the ruling upper class, and not until decades later did the author return to revisit her past and try to find her foster sister who had been left behind.  My favorite non-fiction books are those that let me have a look inside other cultures, and so far I am really enjoying that aspect of this book.  :)

Cuppa is discussing Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman.  Please join us!
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January 31, 2016, 02:26:33 PM
Reply #403

Evreka

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Since my last update in here I've finished three books.

Joe Labero Magic Master which is a portrait of a real life magician of world class who was born in Sweden and has made several shows here, as well as the rest of the world, and was recently performing in Singapore. The book was fantastic to read, and very penetrating. Not a single magical trick was revealed, but a huge amount about the magician, his way through life, his choices, and career. It also revealed a good deal of the compromises that kind of life brings in its wake, as far as family and friend relations go. A great read!

This page shows some really short (about 30 seconds) "video trailers" for some of his shows, to give you some idea of what he can do. For Christmas I got a ticket for his upcoming show in Stockholm in October - I'm almost as excited about that as I am over my Cursed Child ticket!  :madeye: 


Then I read a Swedish book called Får man göra slut med sitt syskon? by Bröderna Luuk or approx.  in English (my translation) Can You End a Sibling Relation? by The Luuk Brothers. Apparently these two brothers have had a theatre performance with this name and this book contains some of the manuscript as well as some interviews and other things. It's amusing (at least for an only child) to see them explore the stereotypes for older/younger siblings and their roles towards each other. On the whole a fairly good book, even if the style was a bit too sporadic (not really a plot in the usual sense) and not so originally different as Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Saffran Foer, that it could afford to do without a bit better structure.



Then I went on to the best read of many months now:  Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline. (Review at Goodreads.) I bought it recently and as I was really in the middle of another book (that I have yet to finish) I intended to just skim read the first few pages to get a feel for the type of book. It grabbed me from page one.  :hermioneread: The next time I became aware of my surroundings I was 50 pages in and getting hungry!

It is a fictional novel which builds its story on roots of reality. Apparently it was customary to assemble orphaned children on the East Coast of the very young nation of the US 1850's to 1929, and send them westward on trains, to find foster homes among the settlers. We get to follow one of them, from her early childhood in the late 1920's to her youth, and further. In parallel, we get to follow the fates of a now 17 year old girl of our time, whose gone through foster care in America of today for most of her life. As the two meet, this story takes off into a very interesting, warm and caring novel which I loved from first page to the last one! :owlso:
« Last Edit: January 31, 2016, 02:31:11 PM by Evreka »
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May 16, 2016, 11:59:04 PM
Reply #404

paint it Black

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Goodness, I am way behind here!  Since checking in last, I have read:

In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson   A non-fiction title about an American ambassador's family in Germany in the buildup to WWII.  Parts were interesting, but it dragged for me.  Others in the book club I read it for really liked it.

The Light Between Oceans by M.L. Stedman   This book has a great premise: a baby washes up to a remote island in a boat and the lighthouse keeper and his wife decide to raise the child.  What could go wrong?  :hmm: This is being made into a film with Michael Fassbender and Alicia Vickander.  Despite all that, I felt that the book never really moved beyond its interesting premise.  The characters did not come alive for me, and the rest of the story was just ok.

A Beautiful Mind by Sylvia Nassar   Biography of the brilliant mathematician John Nash, who won a Nobel Prize despite a very rough battle with schizophrenia.  This is a very long book, and the first half focused too much on the history of the mathematics program at every university where Nash ever worked and studied.  I did muddle through to the end, though.  If you like Russell Crowe, you might be better off checking out the film instead (I have not).

Kindred by Octavia Butler  Fantastic classic (from the 70's) science fiction/historical fiction book.  Dana, an African American woman, keeps being pulled back in time in order to rescue her white ancestor in the Civil War era.  She gets a thorough insider's look at slavery as she is forced to spend long stretches of time living as the property of her ancestor, while slowly trying to convince him to change his ways.  I highly recommend this one!  :thumbup:

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates   If you are an American, I guarantee that you will feel something after reading this essay written by an African American journalist to his teenage son, as a warning about growing up as a black male in America.  You may not like what you feel, however.

The Beach by Alex Garland   Not too long ago, I saw and enjoyed the film Ex Machina, written and directed by Alex Garland, and when I discovered that he also wrote novels I decided to read one.  This book (which was also made into a film, though I haven't seen it) has many of the same themes as Ex Machina, about an outsider being brought into an unusual, isolated environment.  Both works are interesting and well done, but designed to make you feel a bit edgy and uncomfortable.

And finally ... I'm currently reading Everyone Brave is Forgiven by Chris Cleave.  This is a brand new book and I was pleased to time it just right to get my name on the top of the wait list for it at the library.  I really enjoyed Cleave's Little Bee when I read it a few years back; this was my sole reason for selecting this book and I have not been disappointed so far.  This story is set in London during WWII.  Despite this, the characters are much more light hearted (at least initially) than those in Little Bee, but are equally well-drawn.  I'm really enjoying being sucked in to this story; I've passed the half-way point and as I race through it I'm already dreading that it will end too soon.

:hermioneread:

Cuppa is discussing Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman.  Please join us!
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May 21, 2016, 10:32:01 AM
Reply #405

RiverSpirit

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I've been reading The False Prince trilogy by Jennifer A Neilsen. What a great series for all ages! Full of "oh my goodness" moments, heroes, villains and thrilling adventure. Have not enjoyed a children's book like this one for a long time.
  
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July 31, 2016, 05:38:09 AM
Reply #406

paint it Black

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Hello everyone!  How is your summer reading going?  :lunaquibbler:

Since last I wrote, I have read:

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by JK Rowling, because I hadn't read a HP book yet this year, and it was time.  :)

Imagine Me Gone by Adam Haslett, for a book club.  The advance press on this new book was exceptional, and it did not disappoint.  This is a story of a family coping with the mental illness of some of its members.  It is told from the POV of all characters at many ages of their lives.  The portraits are extremely well drawn.  You will feel like you have lived through something after reading this book.  It's the closest I've come to understanding what life must be like for someone suffering with mental illness.

My Abandonment by Peter Rock  This book had an interesting premise: a young girl lives in a hidden shelter in a large city park with her father.  The whole story is told through the POV of the girl, and I felt this left some questions unanswered for me.  Was this man really her father?  Why did she never question what he said?  Why did she make the choices she did?  The story therefore was a bit unsatisfying for me.

The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger  Many of you have probably read this one already; some of you may have even recommended it to me.  :nod:  It's been on my shelf for a year or more since I bought it at a used book sale, and it turned out to be the perfect summer travel book.  Yes, I really liked it!  And yes, for those who have yet to read it, it is a time-travel romance.  For me, even better than the time travel or the romance was simply the character development, and how well these characters mesh with each other, even at different points in their lives.  It's also amazing to contemplate that this is (I believe) a first novel, as the complexities of the plot are nothing to sneeze at.  If you think that there is a chance that you might like this, I'm betting that you will.

I'm currently reading Between You and Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen by Mary Norris, which is part memoir of a copy editor for The New Yorker and part gentle grammar guide.  As I have something of an interest in both these areas, I thought it would be a good fit for me.  However, the memoir part, although written in a friendly style, isn't really sucking me in.  Likewise, the grammar bit seems more complicated than I think it intends to be.  There are definitely a few areas that are addressed here that I think I could brush up on, but I don't see these lessons sticking with me.  I've already moved on to skimming this one, and I may not get to the finish.  But that's ok, for soon I'll be with the rest of you reading Harry Potter  :harry: and the Cursed Child:yay:

Cuppa is discussing Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman.  Please join us!
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September 04, 2016, 09:15:30 PM
Reply #407

Pepper

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I read a lot. I think I read 4-5 books a month.

So far this year, I have read Iris Johansen's Kendra Michael Series, James Patterson's "15th Affair", J.D. Robb's "Brotherhood in Death", Nora Robert's "The Obsession", and Andrea Kane's Forensic Instincts series.

I'm currently reading The latest Forensic Instinct book "The Murder That Never Was."  I'm really enjoying this book and series. I did not like some of her Stand alone novels, but this series is really good. But then I'm a picky reader.

Also, I like the Kendra Michaels series by Iris Johansen and her son Roy. I didn't think I would like them at first, but they have really peeked my interest and I love series books.  Those are my favorite. I just have to keep myself from buying everything that I like.
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September 06, 2016, 02:40:13 PM
Reply #408

HealerOne

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 :reading: I've been remiss in noting what I have been reading. Seems like all of a sudden I have been able to read more. I finally caught up and was able to read The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah. Now I understand why that was on the best seller list. Quite a tale about ordinary French citizens (specifically two sisters) who had to deal with the Nazi's overtaking their country. I also re-read Gray Mountain by Grisham. Both of those novels are for my book club.

Recently I have been devouring  a series written by a fellow Floridian (Marcia Meara) but set in the North Carolina mountains. The First one is called  Wake-Robin Ridge, followed by A Boy Named Rabbit and the last being The Harbinger. They are a combination genre: romantic suspense; plus mystery; plus some paranormal stuff like ghosts and a child with "second sight". I found them very engaging and fun to read - very much page turners! I especially liked the second in the series, but would recommend the entire series. It appears that more books are intended in this series. I can't wait for the next one.

Lastly, I read and re-read Harry Potter and the Cursed Child which we have been discussing here in DiscusssionStation. Hop on over to that discussion after you have read it (It's a spoiler area).
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