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Author Topic: Recipe Swap on the Go  (Read 1159 times)

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February 08, 2013, 03:08:15 AM

ss19

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:cook:

Do you have a special recipe that's been passed down in your family for generations?  Or one that you've created or perfected yourself?  Or perhaps just a personal or family favorite you'd like to share?  Please post them here for other members to try (or to simply admire).


Thank you, Pleione, for suggesting this thread. :) And thank you, BillieMac, for being the inspiration for that suggestion. ;D


Edited to Add:
Just a friendly reminder that because we're an international group, please remember to specify whether you mean °F or °C if there are any mentions of baking or cooking temperatures in your recipes.  :harryronbb:

« Last Edit: February 16, 2013, 03:08:54 PM by ss19 »


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February 15, 2013, 07:42:52 PM
Reply #1

BillieMac

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You're welcome.  ;) So I'll start us off with the inaugural recipe.

Matrimonial Cake (aka Date Squares)

Filling:
2 cups chopped dates
1 tablespoon brown sugar
Juice of 1 lemon, or a capful of Real Lemontm or other brand
1 cup boiling water

Put dates, brown sugar and lemon juice in a pot (preferably aluminum, which can handle sugar better than stainless steel).
Boil water in kettle, measure 1 cup and add to pot.
Cook five minutes, remove from heat, stir, then let cool.

Rolled Oats Mixture:
1 1/2 cups flour
1 1/2 cup rolled oats
2/3 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup shortening

Thoroughly mix flour, oats, sugar and baking soda in a bowl. Sifting isn't necessary.
Blend in shortening

Spread half of the mixture into the bottom of a square cake pan, and tamp down firmly.
Spread cooled date filling evenly over layer.
Spread the rest of the rolled oat mixture evenly on top, just so that it will stay on.

Bake 20-25 minutes at 350o F. It should be lightly browned on top.
Let it cool before cutting it, or it won't hold together.

When I post recipes, I always give more detailed instructions than I have on the recipe card, to clarify for inexperienced cooks. On this one, the recipe card was a real shock. When I copied from Mom's card to mine, I left out every part of the method except the cooking times, because I've made it so often I didn't need any instructions- just a list of the ingredients. It's something I hadn't noticed until I started copying it to post.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2013, 07:42:26 PM by BillieMac »
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February 17, 2013, 03:47:07 AM
Reply #2

Armoracia

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Those sound delicious, BillieMac but why are they called Matrimonial Cake? I'm just curious!
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February 20, 2013, 08:47:50 PM
Reply #3

BillieMac

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Those sound delicious, BillieMac but why are they called Matrimonial Cake? I'm just curious!
I have no idea why, Armoracia. I just googled it on dictionary.com, and all I found out was that it's only called Matrimonial Cake in western Canada (Manitoba to the coast).
Having lived my whole life on the West Coast, I first came across the name Date Squares in an American magazine.

Gingincat, how far south does that go? Is it called Matrimonial Cake, or Date Squares in Washington State?
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March 18, 2013, 05:47:09 AM
Reply #4

paint it Black

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If I tell you that this is good and really easy and almost impossible to mess up you can believe it, because I am no genius in the kitchen.  :cook: I usually make muffins with this recipe, but it is light and sweet enough that you can frost it and use it as a cake  or cupcakes (I have).  You can reduce the sugar if you prefer a less-sweet muffin and it will still turn out fine.  This is a quick and easy way to use up any extra bananas that have ripened before you could eat them all.  ;D


Egg-free, Dairy-free Banana Bread

3 ripe bananas
¼ cup oil
1 cup sugar
1 tsp. baking soda
½ tsp. salt
2 cups flour
¼ cup mini-chocolate chips or finely chopped dried fruit or nuts (optional)

Pre-heat oven to 350°F.  In a large bowl, mash bananas (very ripe ones work the best).  Add oil and sugar and mix well.  Sift flour, salt and soda together and add to banana mixture.  Mix until flour is blended (do not beat).  (Stir in chips/nuts/fruit if desired.)

Lightly oil pans (or add liners to muffin tins).  Pour or spoon batter into pan/s and bake until toothpick comes out clean (approximately 18 minutes for muffins).

Makes 12 muffins (so, probably 1, 8" or 9" cake layer or 1 loaf -- sorry I can't remember!)  :ashamed:

Cuppa is discussing Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman.  Please join us!
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May 08, 2013, 10:41:45 PM
Reply #5

BillieMac

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Last night I steamed a package of those sticky Asian dumplings (shrimp, pork and I don't remember which vegetable), but didn't have a dipping sauce in my fridge. So I decided to try making one on the fly.

Soy sauce, syrup and corn starch in unmeasured portions. I just kind of eyeballed it. Stirred in a pan over medium heat to melt the syrup. A bit much soy sauce and a bit thick, but it was good.

The trick to food experiments is to remember that three is a magical number. All of my successful experiments have no more than three ingredients to start. Once it becomes standard I sometimes try for a fourth, but have to  be careful in my choice or I ruin it.

Unrelated hint: Next ime you have eggs, put coriander instead of pepper on them. You'll be in for a pleasant surprise.
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May 14, 2013, 09:50:02 PM
Reply #6

ss19

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Last night I steamed a package of those sticky Asian dumplings (shrimp, pork and I don't remember which vegetable), but didn't have a dipping sauce in my fridge. So I decided to try making one on the fly.

Soy sauce, syrup and corn starch in unmeasured portions. I just kind of eyeballed it. Stirred in a pan over medium heat to melt the syrup. A bit much soy sauce and a bit thick, but it was good.
There are a couple of more traditional/authentic dipping sauces for Asian dumplings that are very easy to make if you ever want to try them.  Both of them do not require any cooking, only mixing of ingredients.

The first one consists of soy sauce, rice vinegar, and sesame oil.  You kind of eyeball the amounts and adjust them to your taste, but there should be a lot more soy sauce than vinegar, and you only need a few drops of sesame oil as that has a very strong taste.  If you don't have rice vinegar, you can just use regular distilled vinegar or whatever vinegar you happen to have.  But sesame oil must be sesame oil, otherwise the flavor changes completely.

The second one is my personal favorite, and consists of just soy sauce and freshly minced garlic.  Allow the garlic to sit in the soy sauce for some time before you serve it so the flavor can seep into the sauce.  The longer you wait, the stronger the garlic taste.  I usually go for about half an hour or so.
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May 15, 2013, 08:17:02 PM
Reply #7

BillieMac

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My neighbour moved away, and left some stuff in the fridge, including every ingredient you list. :)
Since the house is on the same property as mine, (just three yards away), cleaning out the fridge is part of my caretaking job, and all the food left behind fair game for me.
Thank you so much for the recipes, ss19. :hug:  Now I know what I'm making for dinner tonight.
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July 04, 2014, 09:58:19 PM
Reply #8

BillieMac

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Iced tea: that's what we need this time of year.

Put two litres or US quarts of water and two tea bags into a pot or kettle. (NOT an electric kettle. It has to be easy to clean with baking soda.)
Bring to a boil.
Remove from heat and let steep 5 to 10 minutes, depending how strong you want it.
Fish out teabags.
Add 250 ml (1 cup) sugar to tea. Stir until dissolved.
Add 125 ml (1/2 cup) lemon juice and stir.

Traditionally, the tea is poured hot over ice cubes, but you need some seriously temperature resistant glassware for that.
I always let it cool, then store it in a jug in the fridge.
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