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Author Topic: Seen a good movie lately?  (Read 7371 times)

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February 08, 2013, 11:21:28 PM

RiverSpirit

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Have you seen a movie lately that you just want to tell the world about?

Was it the best movie you have seen in a long time, or ever?

Or did you just sit through something horrible that you want to warn us about?

Well, here is the place to tell us all about what you have been watching.  Be honest, people do have differing opinions. Just remember, if you don't agree...be nice  :D


  
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April 01, 2013, 07:42:53 AM
Reply #1

Maraudingdon

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I've seen two movies this Easter weekend:

Oz The Great and Powerful - visually stunning but totally meh in terms of story.

Jack the Giant Slayer - pretty good special effects, but didn't really get going until the last 20 minutes. It has Ewan McGregor in it though so that was a saver  :hearts:!

I'm totally psyched about seeing Star Trek: Into Darkness next month though. Benedict Cumberbatch  :heart: is the baddie and I will be totally rooting for him! I love anything J.J. Abrams does.
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April 01, 2013, 07:49:15 AM
Reply #2

varza

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Just watched Hitchcock with Anthony Hopkins... kinda weird and could have done without Scarlett Johanson but fascinating to watch. Its about the making of Psycho, learned a lot of new things about what happened around the filming.
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May 05, 2013, 09:00:23 AM
Reply #3

Kickassnoodle

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Last night, I watched the latest adaptation of Wuthering Heights (This one). I didn't think anything could top the Juliette Binoche + Ralph Fiennes version from the 90s, but I just had to check it out, mostly because of Kaya Scodelario and because Andrea Arnold (the writer and director of the film) also did another (creepy and weird) film that I enjoyed (Fish Tank). And, well, this new adaptation left me with rather mixed feelings. Firstly, I'm not sure how I feel about the many changes they made to the story and things they left out - it made the story a lot more depressing and gritty than I remember from the book.

Then there's the cinematography and photography of the film - basically the way it was shot is, well, rather strange, and I think, at places it's trying too hard to be arty and it feels forced. There are a lot of shots focusing on little details in the surroundings that remind me of another creepy and weird but hopeful-in-the-end film, Angels and Insects. Towards the end of the movie I suddenly realised that most of those were sort of metaphorically reflecting the current state of the story (for instance, towards the end when Heathcliff returns rich, they started showing apples rotting in the grass). However, a lot of times it also works really well - especially when we see Heathcliff watching or interacting with Catherine, you can sort of see and feel the things he's focusing on, like her hair or her smile, it's really sweet and beautiful.

And the last thing - the young actors playing young Catherine and Heathcliff (Shannon Beer and Solomon Glave). They cast actual teenagers to play the parts. Now, it's been a while since I read the book last, so I don't remember how old they are supposed to be, but I daresay, younger than Binoche and Fiennes were when they made Wuthering Heights. In any case, both kids are great, especially Catherine, and it feels more realistic.

All in all, I guess, I'm glad I watched this film, but I don't think I'll watch it again, I prefer when they don't cut out the second generation characters, it's just too depressing without them.
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May 05, 2013, 10:51:08 PM
Reply #4

Marielle

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We got to see Iron Man 3 yesterday, and we all enjoyed it very much, loads of action, maybe a little too much, because at some point you get a little lost in the story which is a bit complex for this genre of movie :) Though my husband enjoyed it a lot too, he was a little disappointed by it (because they departed from the original lore).
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May 18, 2013, 08:32:53 PM
Reply #5

Maraudingdon

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Star Trek Into Darkness is AMAZING! Cumberbatch didn't disappoint and had a physicality that was seriously impressive, but what really stood out was the bromance between Kirk and Spock. Because they could dive straight into the action with the exposition required in the first movie, it was totally action-packed.

Loved Bones who stole every scene he was in, and loved the nods to the original series.

Only thing I didn't like was a gratuitous shot of Alice Eve in her underwear which was totally pointless. The blatant sexualisation of female characters is something that really bugs me.
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May 26, 2013, 09:00:11 AM
Reply #6

paint it Black

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We got to see Iron Man 3 yesterday, and we all enjoyed it very much, loads of action, maybe a little too much, because at some point you get a little lost in the story which is a bit complex for this genre of movie :) Though my husband enjoyed it a lot too, he was a little disappointed by it (because they departed from the original lore).
Star Trek Into Darkness is AMAZING! Cumberbatch didn't disappoint and had a physicality that was seriously impressive, but what really stood out was the bromance between Kirk and Spock. Because they could dive straight into the action with the exposition required in the first movie, it was totally action-packed.
I got to see both of these films recently, and thought they were both a really good time.  I do believe I enjoyed Star Trek more; I agree with Maraudingdon's assessment that it is totally action packed!  Benedict Cumberbatch definitely added some gravitas as the villain, and just when you think the peril is going to ease, a new layer is added.  I appreciated Chris Pine's performance as Kirk more this time than in the previous Star Trek -- we watched a Star Trek TV episode not long after and I was surprised to recognize some subtleties that Pine had put in his performance to match Shatner's Kirk.

Loved Bones who stole every scene he was in, and loved the nods to the original series.

Only thing I didn't like was a gratuitous shot of Alice Eve in her underwear which was totally pointless. The blatant sexualisation of female characters is something that really bugs me.
I was surprised that most of the nods to the original series were enjoyable, and only one or two made me  ::) .  I wouldn't be surprised though if the sexualization of the female characters isn't included on some of the film makers' lists of the "nods to the original series".

The others in the family gave the edge to Iron Man, which was also very entertaining.  :bravo:

Cuppa is discussing Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman.  Please join us!
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June 03, 2013, 05:34:28 PM
Reply #7

CallMeSeverus

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Saw a few movies this weekend:

My Week with Marilyn: The acting was fabulous! I loved Kenneth Brannagh as Sir Lawrence Olivier and Michelle Williams did an amazing job as Ms. Monroe! The story is the experience a young 3rd Assistant Director had on the set of Marilyn's movie "The Prince and the Showgirl." We see the expected and typical behavior from Marilyn: always late, sometimes under the influence, a little selfish, a little needy, a little out of it... and we see the typical response from those around her: forgiveness, lavish praise, a strong desire to take care of her... even people that are angered and frustrated by her are soon mesmerized and "on her side." I guess the story was okay, I'm just not a huge fan of Marilyn Monroe...

Perks of Being a Wallflower: this one was fun! I'm not sure if it was the story or the fabulous 80s nostalgia I enjoyed more. I couldn't directly relate to the characters..  their experiences and behaviors were not the same as mine, but at the same time there is something so universal about teenage angst and pain, hope, disappointment, the strong need to belong and feel needed but an insistence on discovering your own identity and being yourself.

Argo: This was a great movie! Full of suspense and dealing with the true events surrounding the rescue of 6 Americans from the Canadian Embassy in Iran in 1980. I remember this story, but just barely because I was only 7 or 8 at the time and because the mission was highly classified it was publicized as a Canadian rescue and the details were kept confidential until about 15 years ago. The movie does a good job of keeping the audience aware of the danger and the risk of life to everyone involved! I found myself on the Edgar of my seat, hoping they make it, even though I already know they made it out okay!

The Man with the Iron Fists: oh boy... definitely not my kind of movie! Hahaha! I understand I wasn't the target audience... as another pet project of Quinten Tarrantino, this project was most likely geared toward others like him who grew up watching cheesy Kung Fu movies, and it had its funny moments, but it was just a little over the top... lots of gratuitous violence and sex, which is fine, if that's your thing, but the story was lacking and just not clever enough to be a good satire!

Life of Pi: Beautiful movie! I realize almost the entire movie is CGI, but I was fine with that! It was well done CGI and it was all just amazing to look at. For the most part the story was pretty simple... the boy's struggle to survive a shipwreck with the help of a tiger... but there is also the deeper layer of the boy's journey to manhood, his self-discovery, and most importantly, his discovery of God! It is only in giving himself to God's will that he is able to find Him! It is for this part of the story that I want to watch the movie again! That was the main character's reason for passing his story on to the journalist in the movie... that is the reason for the movie...

The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo: this was the American remake of the original Swedish movie(s) which was based on the bestselling novel. It was good, tells the story, but it just seemed a little lacking compared to the original movie. I suppose if you haven't read the books or seen the original movies, then it was really good... I'm wondering if they're planning to finish the trilogy...? My recommendation is to watch the original movies... all are streaming on Netflix right now! Intense story and very believable acting from everyone!
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June 19, 2013, 05:34:18 PM
Reply #8

Kickassnoodle

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The day before yesterday I watched Star Trek (2009) and yesterday I went to see Star Trek. Into Darkness. I can't believe it took me something like 4 years to see the first movie. I'm totally obsessed with both of them now! (I only ever saw glimpses of the original Star Trek from 1966 before, but now I'm going to watch it all.) I find them both near perfection. My two main quips are the lack of well-rounded prominent female characters (Uhura is the only prominent woman on the bridge and only comes to light as a kick-ass person as she is a little more in the second film) and lack of prominent alien characters (other than Vulcans and Romulans) - would it have hurt them to make Sulu's or Chekov's or Scotty's or even Bones's or even some of the older captains' characters alien? I don't know maybe it's just me having just finished watching Babylon 5 series which has a lot of great complex alien characters.

Only thing I didn't like was a gratuitous shot of Alice Eve in her underwear which was totally pointless. The blatant sexualisation of female characters is something that really bugs me.
Me too. Overall, these films don't score well on good female representation, in my opinion. I hope they fix that if they make more of these films.

Despite all that, I love love love these films. Kirk and Spock are of course most fun to watch, but Bones, Sulu, Chekov, Uhura (to an extent) and Scotty (I just love him!) are great supporting cast - I just wish the writers had given Uhura more funny moments. Graphics and designs are just stunning. Scripts are well-written IMO - even though there are some overly sentimental borderline-cheesy bits (for my tastes anyway), it's just such a great romp that I think they work pretty well. Oh, and Khan. Despite knowing that he was evil beforehand, I just found it so difficult to believe that he was really the bad guy until he said that he would never have spared Kirk's crew - it was pretty shocking. Also, Benedict Cumberbatch as a superior human being - how fitting is that :fredgeorge:
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June 27, 2013, 06:26:32 PM
Reply #9

siena

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I saw Before Midnight yesterday. As with Before Sunrise and Before Sunset, Richard Linklater did a great job with this kind of dialogue film, helped along by the very obvious on-screen chemistry between Ethan Hawke (he is particularly brilliant as Jessie) and Julie Delpy, who both co-wrote the script. Believable story of a normal couple - I remember watching Before Sunrise very well ... aaah to have been so young once ... ;)
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June 28, 2013, 12:40:23 AM
Reply #10

paint it Black

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The day before yesterday I watched Star Trek (2009) and yesterday I went to see Star Trek. Into Darkness. [....]  My two main quips are the lack of well-rounded prominent female characters (Uhura is the only prominent woman on the bridge and only comes to light as a kick-ass person as she is a little more in the second film) and lack of prominent alien characters (other than Vulcans and Romulans) - would it have hurt them to make Sulu's or Chekov's or Scotty's or even Bones's or even some of the older captains' characters alien?
I suspect that this has a lot to do with honoring the original tv series.  They are creating a prequel to a series that has had such a huge fan base, so it is a tricky balance to create characters that are true to what the fans know already, but are a bit more complex and a few levels more exciting.  Back in the mid-60's when Star Trek was created, the show was actually really ground-breaking for the diversity of its cast.  Nichelle Nichols as Uhura was the first African-American woman to have such an important role in a tv series, and the fact that there was even one alien on the crew of the Enterprise made conservative tv execs nervous.  That said, I hope they continue to highlight Uhura's role in (what will hopefully be several!) coming films in this franchise.  I do like that she is presented as whip-smart, and someone who will not let any man walk over her, personally or professionally; her brains rather than her brawn are her main asset.  One thing that I love about the 2009 film is that everyone on the crew from Chekov on up has their shining moment where they save the day.  The scene on the drill where Sulu whips out his telescoping sword and kicks the alien's butt before lifting Kirk to safety is one of my favorites.

(I only ever saw glimpses of the original Star Trek from 1966 before, but now I'm going to watch it all.)
I suspect that you will be less than blown over by the original series compared to the new films -- the production values fall way short, but the storytelling is very good, and you will get to see some iconic characteristics of the lead actors and running jokes that are carried over into the new films.  If you think the women are exploited in the new film though, hang on to your hat!  Apparently ladies on other planets really like showing their skin in groovy 60's outfits.  :o  ::)


I recently saw The Impossible on dvd.  It might seem likely that a film that spends the majority of its time showing people trying to find medical help and trying to find each other would drag a bit, but the (true) story of the family that is dramatized here pulls one in, as it touches basic things within us that we all can relate to.  The main event of the story (the tsunami) is also riveting, and is stunningly done.  The performances are all excellent, even the children.  I'm glad to have seen it, but overall I'm glad that I saw it at home.  I don't like getting weepy in the cinema, and I found it necessary to keep the tissue box handy with this one.  :ashamed:

Cuppa is discussing Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman.  Please join us!
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June 28, 2013, 03:33:30 AM
Reply #11

RiverSpirit

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Saw Despicable Me 2. It was one of the best kids movies I have seen in a long time.

Lots of laughs for kids and adults.
  
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June 28, 2013, 03:37:26 AM
Reply #12

Hermione P

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Watched Monsters University & the short film preceding it The Blue Umbrella yesterday. I rather like The Blue Umbrella, and Monsters University is hilarious.

Saw Despicable Me 2. It was one of the best kids movies I have seen in a long time.

Lots of laughs for kids and adults.

Despicable Me 2 will only be released next week in Singapore. They showed the trailer before Monsters University, looks funny.
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August 17, 2013, 09:42:02 AM
Reply #13

paint it Black

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I saw the newest Wolverine movie recently.  I'm only new to the whole X-Men thing this year, having watched the 3 main stories on dvd.  I like them well enough, but they are not deep-down favorites.  Still, the Wolverine character is entertaining, and I was looking forward to the film.  The story, I'm afraid, wasn't rich enough to win me over.  The female villain was a bit too comic-book to fit in with the rest of the cast; even though the series is based upon a comic book, the films should have characters that have clear motives and a real reason to exist in the story, other than that they are evil.  ::) And overall, I just felt that there was way too much impaling in this film for my taste.  I can definitely appreciate a kick-ass fight scene, and yeah I know the film is named for a guy with knives in his hands, but this film is made up of fight after fight between the Wolverine and guys with samurai swords.  :scared: Enough said.

On the plus side, if you go to these films to stock up on shirtless Hugh Jackman eye candy, you won't be disappointed.


Cuppa is discussing Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman.  Please join us!
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September 08, 2013, 11:16:48 AM
Reply #14

siena

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I saw About Time yesterday and have to say I loved it. As Mark Kermode points out in his review in The Observer, it is easy to sneer at yet another Richard Curtis RomCom, yet it moves us and therefore delivers - eg a good film and sound entertainment, nothing more or nothing less.

Bill Nighy is funny as ever, and you will also see Domhnall Gleeson (Bill Weasley) in a stellar role. The plot reminded me a little bit of the time travelling issues raised in Prisoner of Azkaban - namely that the ability to change time doesn't come without its own flaws and set of hurdles.

Well done.

Another good film I saw recently is What Maisie Knew - based on Henry James' novel about a kid lost in a custody battle. The film transports the story to modern times and it does so very successfully. I was very impressed by the young actress playing Maisie (Onata Aprile) - I wouldn't be suprised at all if she was the youngest person ever to get nominated for all sorts of awards. Alexander Skarsgard (Lord he is gorgeous !), Julianne Moore and Steve Coogan are also great.
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September 12, 2013, 05:48:44 PM
Reply #15

HealerOne

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You ever go to a movie and it sticks with you for weeks? That's what happened to me when I went to see Lee Daniel's The Butler. It's a story about a black man who starts out life as a child working the cotton fields until his daddy is killed by the white owner of the field they worked in. The child is taken in by the white home owner who teaches him how to be a house servant. He eventually ends up as a butler in The White House. He served seven US Presidents. The story is about history as well as this man's life. It was powerful and unabashed in it's presentation of the Presidents, of their family and what was happening in the US at that time with Civil rights. I lived through most of that history and I have to say it was sad watching it, yet at the same time I realized that as a nation we have come far in changing our ways. However living in the South now, I sometimes wonder that we still have a ways to go. I hope that those outside the USA who see this film will understand that our past is ragged. That it is history and that doesn't change, but our future is changing for the better. I would caution any who see the movie that it certainly is not one to take young or impressionable children to because it is raw and unapologetic for what it shows.
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September 12, 2013, 07:54:19 PM
Reply #16

siena

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You might want to read Orville Lloyd's article Why I won't be watching The Butler and 12 Years as a Slave on  guardian.com about this film, HealerOne. It gives an interesting perspective expressed by a Black person about these kind of films ...
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November 11, 2013, 02:58:52 PM
Reply #17

siena

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I saw two films recently which are both very remarkable although they are very different: The first one is Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban director Alfonso Cuaron's latest thriller about two astronauts (Sandra Bullock, George Clooney) working frantically to save themselves after an accident leaves them hopelessly adrift in space: Gravity. It is a surival tale, amazingly shot, visually stunning, that will leave you choking on your popcorn ....

The second is Stephen Frear's Philomena with Judi Dench and Steve Coogan. It's 1950's Ireland, and Catholic authorities forced thousands of Irish mothers to give up their children for adoption to rich Americans, without the hope of ever seeing them again. Philomena is one of the mothers, and she goes on a journey with the help of a journalist to finally discover her son, and to find out who is and whether he remembers Ireland at all. It is a true story about forgiveness that left most of the audience (including me)  in tears.
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November 12, 2013, 10:01:02 AM
Reply #18

Kickassnoodle

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I watched The History Boys last week and, man, I'm obsessed with this film now! I've been rewatching my favourite parts every night. It's a kind of period film, I suppose, being set in the early 80s while being made in 2006, it's about a group of teenage boys preparing to get into Oxford/Cambridge and their three teachers. The script is so amazing, it hits my favourite parts of a high-school film (teachers revealing their vulnerability, discussing difficult subjects, field trips when boundaries start fading, etc.) and I love the way each character is constructed. And Stephen Campbell Moore is sooo swoon-worthy! I just wish the class included some female students as well.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2013, 10:18:27 AM by Kickassnoodle »
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November 12, 2013, 11:24:22 AM
Reply #19

siena

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Grammar School, if you please, kickassnoodle, not High School .... ;) The History Boys is set in England, after all ...

But I agree - both the film and the play are fantastic.
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