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Author Topic: Seen a good movie lately?  (Read 8124 times)

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November 23, 2013, 11:39:20 AM
Reply #20

Potter2005

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I saw Catching Fire on Thursday and it is such an amazing movie.

Extremely faithful to the book, visually stunning and some great performances from the cast especially the actress who plays Katniss.

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November 25, 2013, 01:30:15 PM
Reply #21

Kickassnoodle

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I saw Catching Fire on Thursday and it is such an amazing movie.

Extremely faithful to the book, visually stunning and some great performances from the cast especially the actress who plays Katniss.
I watched it too, on Saturday! I loved it too. The visuals are amazing all throughout the film. Loved all the dresses Katniss wore in the capitol. The performances were also good - I loved all the other tributes, how they show the effects the Games had on them, especially Johanna. Jennifer Lawrence (Katniss) is amazing, as always, seeing her suffering from trauma of the first games and then trying to appease President Snow by acting as though she's in love - it was chilling. Though great editing also added to that feeling - you know, by showing all those people in crowds, crying and raising three fingers in silence or shouting for Katniss to speak her mind. I also love how Haymitch has been brought to life - he's somewhat more sympathetic than I remember him being in the books. All in all, great film. I think, I like it even better than the first one, and I loved the first one.
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February 11, 2014, 07:47:11 AM
Reply #22

Laura W

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siena wrote:
"The second is Stephen Frear's Philomena with Judi Dench and Steve Coogan. It's 1950's Ireland, and Catholic authorities forced thousands of Irish mothers to give up their children for adoption to rich Americans, without the hope of ever seeing them again. Philomena is one of the mothers, and she goes on a journey with the help of a journalist to finally discover her son, and to find out who is and whether he remembers Ireland at all. It is a true story about forgiveness that left most of the audience (including me)  in tears."



That film got very good reviews here, siena.  But I didn't see it.  (By the way, I am sure I would never be as forgiving as she apparently was!)

The last movie i saw in a movie theatre was in December 2013.  It was Saving Mr. Banks.  It was based on the true story of how the Mary Poppins movie got made by Disney studio.  Quite frankly, I liked this film a lot more than I liked the MP movie which starred Julie Andrews, Dick Van Dyke et al.  Of course, Saving Mr. Banks was about a lot more than what I just wrote, including the family dynamics of the author of the Mary Poppins books when she was a child.  I enjoyed this movie, including the performance by Emma Thompson.  And I thought the more minor actors in it were very good as well (especially the guy who played her driver). The cinematography, clothing, makeup, hairstyles, etc. really captured both Australia in the 1930s and California in the early 1960s.

Not one of my most favourite movies ever, but certainly worth seeing.

lw

« Last Edit: February 11, 2014, 08:09:51 AM by Laura W »
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February 12, 2014, 08:50:49 AM
Reply #23

RiverSpirit

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I watched The History Boys last week and, man, I'm obsessed with this film now! I've been rewatching my favourite parts every night. It's a kind of period film, I suppose, being set in the early 80s while being made in 2006, it's about a group of teenage boys preparing to get into Oxford/Cambridge and their three teachers. The script is so amazing, it hits my favourite parts of a high-school film (teachers revealing their vulnerability, discussing difficult subjects, field trips when boundaries start fading, etc.) and I love the way each character is constructed. And Stephen Campbell Moore is sooo swoon-worthy! I just wish the class included some female students as well.

I really liked this movie. I work in a boys school and I could relate to the pressure and expectations on the boys.

My favourite movie lately is Frozen. It might be a Disney princess movie but it is one like no other. Beautiful movie with a beautiful message. Very funny, too!
  
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February 18, 2014, 06:38:49 PM
Reply #24

siena

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I saw Dallas Buyers Club the other day. It is about the true story of Ron Woodroof, a rodeo rider and hedonist who was diagnosed HIV positive in 1985 Texas. Until that point, like many people at that time, he used to believe that only homosexuals could contract the disease. Having been told by the doctors he would have only thirty days to live and because he was responding badly to the medication given to him, he conducted his own research into drugs that were approved abroad, but not in the US. With the help from a young doctor who was a bit more open minded and transgender woman Rayon he founded an illegal Buyers Club to import the drugs from abroad, thereby helping a lot of people fighting the disease.

The film is utterly unsentimental, but nevertheless or maybe because of it  the growing friendship and respect between the former homophobe Woodroof and transsexual Rayon is very moving to watch. Matthew McConaughey and Jared Letro give the performances of their lives, and the film is a powerful reminder of the eighties when little was understood about AIDS and its treatment, and the difficulty of an individual's battle against the (medical) establishment.

It is a tough watch, but highly recommended.
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February 19, 2014, 05:24:29 AM
Reply #25

HealerOne

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siena wrote:
"The second is Stephen Frear's Philomena with Judi Dench and Steve Coogan. It's 1950's Ireland, and Catholic authorities forced thousands of Irish mothers to give up their children for adoption to rich Americans, without the hope of ever seeing them again. Philomena is one of the mothers, and she goes on a journey with the help of a journalist to finally discover her son, and to find out who is and whether he remembers Ireland at all. It is a true story about forgiveness that left most of the audience (including me)  in tears."



That film got very good reviews here, siena.  But I didn't see it.  (By the way, I am sure I would never be as forgiving as she apparently was!)

The last movie i saw in a movie theatre was in December 2013.  It was Saving Mr. Banks.  It was based on the true story of how the Mary Poppins movie got made by Disney studio.  Quite frankly, I liked this film a lot more than I liked the MP movie which starred Julie Andrews, Dick Van Dyke et al.  Of course, Saving Mr. Banks was about a lot more than what I just wrote, including the family dynamics of the author of the Mary Poppins books when she was a child.  I enjoyed this movie, including the performance by Emma Thompson.  And I thought the more minor actors in it were very good as well (especially the guy who played her driver). The cinematography, clothing, makeup, hairstyles, etc. really captured both Australia in the 1930s and California in the early 1960s.

I saw both these movies and I loved Emma Thompson's performance even above Judi Dench's. Both were such good movies because they were wonderful stories about strong women. It's too bad Emma didn't get mentioned for her performance by the Oscar's. I thought it surely was of that caliber. BTW if you watched Downton Abbey - the guy that played the driver in Saving Mr. Banks (Paul Giamatti) took on the part of Mary's American cousin. He was excellent in that part too. 
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March 09, 2014, 09:15:12 AM
Reply #26

Laura W

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Yesterday I finally went to see the movie, Frozen, and I enjoyed it thoroughly!  Oh sure, it was a bit over the top and show off in its animation, but beautifully done regardless.  And the musical numbers were also sometimes over the top and perhaps there were too many of them, but it reminded me of a giant Broadway musical.  Wonderful in-your-face sets, wonderful in-your-face costumes, in-your-face musical and/or dance numbers.  Not what I would want in all my animation films by any means.  But certainly fun and exciting as an occasional experience.  As I found Frozen   :snowman:  to be.

It's for sure a fairy tale, a legend, not a piece of realism, and that was conveyed spot on by the screenwriter, director, animators, editors and everyone involved in the film.  Like many fairy tales it was at once magical, funny, scary, sad, moralistic, exciting and - in this case - (for me) terribly romantic.  A lovely movie of its type.

Warning though ... If I remember correctly, the closing credits state that the film is based on Hans Christian Andersen's famous story, "The Snow Queen".  I know that fable, and this has NOTHING in common with it !



Laura
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April 28, 2014, 07:55:05 PM
Reply #27

siena

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I saw a really sweet Swedish film the other day called Vi aer baest ( I'm sorry, I can't do Umlaute on this keyboard) which translates We Are The Best . It is a film by Lukas Moodysson based on a graphic novel by his wife Coco Moodysson about two young girls called Bobo and Klara who decide to form a punk band in 1982 Stockholm. Everyone tells them punk is dead, but among all the 80s glamour and perms they try to find their niche. Deciding that they would need at least one person in the band who actually can play, they recruit shy outsider Hedvig, who is their age and is a classical guitarist. ( In one particularly moving scene, Hedvig tries out an electric guitar for the first time, with stunning results.)  Together they form a very unusual friendship that goes through the ups and downs of unrequited love, hairstyling disasters and not really fitting in anywhere.

It doesn't really matter that much that they don't get very far and that their only song consists of pretty much just one line (Hate The Sport, inspired by an uninspiring PE class  :P ) - their friendship is stronger than that, and that's what makes the film worth watching, together with very strong performances from the young actresses.

The film was shown in my cinema in the Swedish original with subtitles. It gave a very authentic feel to it to hear the original language, which sounded quite nice.
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May 13, 2014, 04:51:56 PM
Reply #28

siena

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Okay, I'm going to try to write this review now - I've been thinking about this for so long and it is not going to get any easier anyway.

Do not despair, one of the thieves was saved. Do not presume, one of the thieves was damned.

This quote has generally been attributed to St Augustine, who is said to have spoken a warning against being too confident about Christian salvation. In his film Calvary, Irish director/writer John Michael McDonagh uses Augustine's words to provide the heading for what is to follow. And what does follow is most definately NOT a laughing matter (despite being advertised as a Black Comedy: black it is indeed, but comical is most definately is not).

Father James Lavelle is a priest in a small coastal village in Sligo in the North West of Southern Ireland. He is a good man who tries to look after his people in an honest and righteous manner, giving a lot but mostly being received most ungraceously. The opening scene shows him in close up during confession. One member of his Parish tells him that he had been abused several times by a Priest during his childhood. As a revenge, he plans to kill Father James simply because he is there and because he has always been good and has never put a foot wrong. He gives him one week to put his affairs in order.

The viewer is left with outrage - outrage in the face of a child having been abused but also in the face of the absurdity of the crime proposed: Why should an innocent man be made to suffer for a crime someone else committed and never atoned for ? We learn that the rapist in question is dead now and that the victim never received appropiate help - for whatever reason, we'll never know.

High Noon with Gary Cooper shows a man torn between his duty as a Marshall and his wife's religious beliefs. In Calvary, there isn't any Grace Kelly character to come to Father James' aid in the final showdown on a remote beach.

I have to say that up to ver recently I have never been very religious. The sacrifice Jesus Christ made for all mankind was taught to me as a child, it was there as a concept, but no more.
I watched Mel Gibson's The Passion of Christ (2004) and was suitably appalled by the prolonged violence.
 However, after watching Calvary, in which a human being with all his flaws and faults but utter belief to do some good in the world walked towards his own personal Golgotha, being selected to atone for the crimes his Catholic Church stands for,  it suddenly hit me with a vengeance how unjust and sick it is what happened to Christ: One human being taking the blame for the crimes of mankind all in one go, without a reasonable trial.

I wanted to write that Calvary is the Anti-Philomena (Stephen Frears, see my review a couple of posts above). Philomena Lee forgives.  In Calvary, the person sinned against cannot forgive. I don't want to give away the ending in case you want to go and see the film - but what it ultimately taught me is that God did forgive - by sending his Son to us to suffer for the crimes WE did commit.

This film did something for me that none other did before. It opened up true Christian belief to me in its most raw, human form. I watched it on Good Friday and it took me this long to gather my thoughts into a reasonably coherent shape to write this.
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May 22, 2014, 07:48:29 AM
Reply #29

Laura W

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Over what was the Victoria Day Weekend in this country, a friend and I took a gamble and went to see an Indian movie at the theatre.  It was called "The Lunchbox" and is apparently quite a famous film.  It was different - for me - but I liked it.  It was both funny and sad.  And very intelligent.  All about how people's lives change through accidental occurances.  I have thought about it several times in the days since I saw "The Lunchbox", which tells me that it certainly made an impression.

laura
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May 22, 2014, 12:56:13 PM
Reply #30

siena

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I saw The Lunchbox as well  :)

I loved it and it made me very hungry - I had to seek out my favourite Indian restaurant in town straight afterwards  ;D
I had to laugh when the guy from the Cantine thought it was the cauliflower that made all the difference  :lol:

I also liked the relationship between Saajan and the happy-go-lucky trainee ...

But I did feel very sad about Saajan's reaction when he was supposed to meet Ila in the cafe - he seemed to think he doesn't deserve happiness, he seemed to be really stuck in his melancholy. I would have loved to shake him there and then ! He said Ila is so young and beautiful, but he was a really good looking guy as well I have to say  :thumbup:

Did you read the novel Love Virtually by Austrian writer Daniel Glattauer ? It is about an accidental email relationship. The film reminded me a lot of that book.
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May 30, 2014, 11:21:44 PM
Reply #31

Evreka

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The last two nights I've watched two films on DVD:

The Last Song
At IMDB. I got it not so long ago because it was based on a novel by Nicholas Spark (and though I haven't read that novel, I've liked other novels by him). For someone who hasn't read the book, it was sort of a sweet story beginning with a rebellious teen girl and her younger brother coming to visit their father for the summer, and progressing into young love by the ocean, some drama and both laughter and sadness.

But it felt... a bit too episodic al (?) and thin, as if something was missing, mostly plot wise, I guess. It didn't tie beautifully together, and I guess there are explanations in the novel that you need to know to get some connections that just feels weird in the film.  Spoiler Alert:
Spoiler
For instance it is really hard to understand why a rebellious girl (Ronnie), would want to give up the money she got to get herself a great dress for a wedding, would give them to the girl (Blaze) that she only just met a few times? Especially as this "friend" Blaze first accused Ronnie falsely of trying to steal Blaze's boyfriend and then framed her for a shop-lifting she didn't commit, by planting a bracelet in her bag without Ronnie's knowledge. Why on Earth would Ronnie help her at all, much less by giving her a lot of money, because Blaze's boyfriend wanted money from Blaze? It seems completely  :jester: crazy to me.  :what:

Further, why would Ronnie's boyfriend's family banish two girls from their party, just because they were attacked and threatened by a git of a local teen? It seems completely irrational and quite unbelievable.
And, in fact these aren't the only two things that feel as if there are huge plot holes in the film.


The Intouchables
At IMDB.

Today I finished my next book En oväntad vänskap (English title You Changed My Life, original French title Tu as changé ma vie - Intouchables pour toujours  by Abdel Sellou).

It tells the true story of a most unexpected friendship that sprang up between the extremely wealthy French aristocrat Phillippe Pozzo di Borgo, who became paralyzed from the neck down in a para gliding accident in 1993, and the personal assistant, Abdel Sellou, that he hired in 1994. ...

The most interesting thing about this is the common mix-up that people seem to make. When I just bought this book, the following happened as I was going home:

The other was En oväntad vänskap (In English approx An Unexpected Friendship)by Abdel Sellou. ...

However, the most surprising thing about it is this: On my ride through the Underground/Tube on my way home today, I picked it up and read the text on the back of it and the foreword. While doing so, two different strangers (without knowing of each other), spontaneously congratulated me for having bought it as it was "a truly wonderful story"!!! :surprised: Both owned the film, and was obviously thrilled by it. It isn't exactly common that strangers approach each other on the Underground, and strike up conversations. (It happens occasionally for things like what time it is or where the line goes.... that kind of things.) But for two people to do it within 15 minutes or so on the same trip and for the reason of somebody's book.... this story must really be special!!!  :hermioneread:
....
If I can find ... the movie, I may well try to get those too....
It's a surprisingly funny film, given the context and some very inappropriate jokes told between the two main characters, and it doesn't always tally well with the book I just read; but it is much funnier than I expected it to be, and a mostly heart-warming story of a very unlikely bond of friendship and mutual respect that sprang up between these two men. Like the people on the Underground, this is a film, I'd recommend seeing.  :)
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June 02, 2014, 03:20:37 PM
Reply #32

Hermione P

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I just finished watching the movie Australia. Found the first subplot about Nicole Kidman's character arriving in Australia too long (and therefore making the whole movie rather long). She and Hugh Jackman's character and the little boy make a touching family.
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June 02, 2014, 06:48:56 PM
Reply #33

siena

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I saw the latest adaptation of a Patricia Highsmith novel The Two Faces of January. As you would expect from Highsmith, this is a very sleek suspense thriller. Viggo Mortenson plays charismatic Chester McFarland, whose past dealings soon catch up with him, leaving him and his wife in quite a predicament on foreign grounds in Athens and a small island in Greece, becoming dependant on a tour guide they meet by chance. The plot does keep you glued to your seat - and yet this is not nearly as good as Rene Clement's Plein Soleil (or Purple Noon) which is a 1960  adaptation of The Talented Mr Ripley with the unsurpassed Alain Delon in the title role. If you are a Patricia Highsmith fan I suggest you watch it (and do forget about the later version with Matt Damon  ;)
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June 05, 2014, 04:51:32 PM
Reply #34

HealerOne

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Recently I went to see Belle a Regency period piece which of course meant it had beautiful costumes and settings. However the story was more than that! It was based on a true story and was inspired by a painting! Belle was a biracial child of a Sir Lord Lindsey and she was brought up in the home of the Earl of Mansfield - the Earl who just happened to be the Chief Justice of England. The movie story is twofold: that of the life of this woman during the rigid rules of society then; and the story of the Chief Justice's decision that led to the ending of slavery in England. Both stories were well done but I would have liked to have both stories expanded! Of course you can't do that in the allotted time of a movie, so at least both stories made me itch to get to my computer and do some research about each.  I found this which was very informative about the picture that inspired the movie. http://www.scotsman.com/what-s-on/film/portrait-of-woman-who-inspired-belle-to-be-shown-1-3306617  And this which was helpful in explaining the case involved with the slave trade. http://www.blackpast.org/gah/zong-massacre-1781 The movie was one which I will not forget soon. I would recommend that you see it if you can.
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July 12, 2014, 06:41:00 AM
Reply #35

Hermione P

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I watched 84 Charing Cross Road because I read it in school. I enjoy being able to see the letters in context (post-war rationing and all that).

I wonder if the correspondence would still happen if it had begun in this age of online shopping.
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July 12, 2014, 05:37:51 PM
Reply #36

Laura W

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I watched 84 Charing Cross Road because I read it in school. I enjoy being able to see the letters in context (post-war rationing and all that).

I wonder if the correspondence would still happen if it had begun in this age of online shopping.



When I was much, much younger I went to see this film at a movie theatre with my mother.  I LOVED it.  Quite a few years after that - like 10 or more - I read the book.  I actually liked the movie more than the book, which rarely happens with me. 

laura
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July 17, 2014, 06:56:56 PM
Reply #37

ss19

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I watched Frozen a couple of days ago while visiting relatives.  I liked it more than I expected to like a Disney fairy tale, and liked the music as well.  My 9-year-old daughter was also watching it for the first time but she already knew most of the songs by heart and was singing along when each one came up.  Apparently one of her best friends in school loves this movie and the music in it and taught her these songs whenever they had free time in school.  That, to me, is an indication of a job well done by everyone who put this movie together.  :thumbup:
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August 21, 2014, 04:55:17 PM
Reply #38

paint it Black

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I recently saw Guardians of the Galaxy.  I have to say that the trailers for this film did not intrigue me.  There was no amazing story in evidence and none of the characters really grabbed me; the talking raccoon seemed particularly annoying.  But the reviews were amazing; both reviewers and people I spoke with said it was really funny.  I do tend to like the Marvel movie franchise, so I thought it would be worth a try.  It turns out that there was no amazing story in evidence and none of the characters really grabbed me, and that the talking raccoon was particularly annoying.   ::)  It wasn't a total waste of time though and it was reasonably entertaining, but I personally found it kind of forgetable.  I may be in the minority, though -- you may think it's great!  :)

Cuppa is discussing Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman.  Please join us!
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August 23, 2014, 12:54:59 AM
Reply #39

HealerOne

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I made a point of going to see Daniel Radcliffe's romantic comedy, What If. (I think it is also out under the name of The F Word). I was happy to see Daniel in a romantic movie. I thought he carried it off fairly well. The chemistry between him and his costar was quite nice. The language is a bit salty at times, but not awful. The two other males leads - and forgive me I don't know their names - I thought were very well cast. It was interesting that the boyfriend of the girl (Of course, it's a love triangle) was a very nice guy, making the tug of war between which guy is best for the girl - all the more difficult and thus more believable, too.
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