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Author Topic: The Writer's Round Table  (Read 17427 times)

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April 01, 2013, 07:42:02 AM
Reply #20

varza

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I can't edit as I write, I tried and then I end up rewriting whole sections and forgetting to keep going.

Also wanted to NaNoWriMo - maybe in a few years when Miles is a bit older.
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April 01, 2013, 08:03:40 PM
Reply #21

Evreka

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I'm an OCD writer!
Meaning what? Sorry, I am not familiar with this abbreviation.  :crabbegoyle:

Its hard editing your own work sometimes, at least it is for me esp since I know how horrible I am with grammer and the such.
I've always had a lot easier spotting errors others make in a text, than my own. I guess it's because I read what I assume I wrote rather than what is actually there? Although if I wait an hour or two I sometimes spot more errors than I did at first, in my own texts.


« Last Edit: April 01, 2013, 08:05:46 PM by Evreka »
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April 04, 2013, 05:34:59 AM
Reply #22

varza

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Meaning what? Sorry, I am not familiar with this abbreviation.  :crabbegoyle:
OCD= Obsessive Compulsive Disorder... perfectionist pretty much

Quote
I've always had a lot easier spotting errors others make in a text, than my own. I guess it's because I read what I assume I wrote rather than what is actually there? Although if I wait an hour or two I sometimes spot more errors than I did at first, in my own texts.
I can do that when I go thru to rewrite. I had started editing my one piece when I hit 50,000 then my 2yr old got a hold of the papers and started editing himself.  :fredgeorge:
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April 04, 2013, 06:23:17 PM
Reply #23

Evreka

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I can do that when I go thru to rewrite. I had started editing my one piece when I hit 50,000 then my 2yr old got a hold of the papers and started editing himself.  :fredgeorge:
Ouch! Did you have a copy of it somewhere or were you able to read the text even after these presumably creative and somewhat surprising edits? ;)

Thanks for the OCD, explanation!  :bear:
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April 06, 2013, 07:34:56 AM
Reply #24

varza

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Oh yeah! I have it saved on my computer. It was just a copy I printed out. I have no idea where it even ended up. As long as one of the garbage men doesn't steal it. :D
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April 07, 2013, 11:59:32 PM
Reply #25

varza

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Okay, I have a question because I am currently reading about how writing changed after WW2 in the US and how people were writing to write the definitive book about a topic and write a best seller. There are all types of writers out there and I was wondering what is your goal with your writing? Do you want to write a classic novel? Write and publish lots of books? and so on...
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May 02, 2013, 05:16:54 PM
Reply #26

HealerOne

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Okay, I have a question because I am currently reading about how writing changed after WW2 in the US and how people were writing to write the definitive book about a topic and write a best seller. There are all types of writers out there and I was wondering what is your goal with your writing? Do you want to write a classic novel? Write and publish lots of books? and so on...

Great question, varza! Since I am retired - from a wonderful and fulfilling profession - I'm not sure if my answer will be different form others. I found I needed something to fill my time, to allow for my creative side which had been somewhat squashed by my work life and to just allow me to express myself in a different way. I have always loved reading and writing, so writing novels/stories seemed to fit perfectly my needs. I can't say I am looking to write the Great American Novel at all, but like others things in my life, I just want to do writing well - really well! Of course like for most writers, publishing is the goal that I would like to do. However finding an agent has become so frustrating that I am aiming for e-book publication instead. We are actually in a wonderful period of time in that as writers we aren't at the mercy of the publication companies to get our work out into the public domain.

I'm currently in the process of writing my third novel (but my first was not finished, my second was the one which I am trying to edit for e-book publication). It's sort of daunting working on two projects at the same time. I really have no idea how many actual novels I will write but I do hope it will be many!     
« Last Edit: May 03, 2013, 10:54:15 PM by HealerOne »
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May 02, 2013, 07:14:31 PM
Reply #27

Evreka

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I'm currently in the process of writing my third novel (but my first was not finished, my second was the one which I am trying to edit for e-book publication). It's sort of daunting working on two projects at the same time. I really have no idea how many actual novels I will write but I do hope it will be many!     

Oh dear, I am very, very impressed that you can work on two such huge projects at once!  :ravenclawc: Are the book you edit and the one you write in different genres? Otherwise it seems like a murderous task not to mix them with each other!? How do you do it?


As to varza's question, I write entirely for my own pleasure. Since 2008 I have regularly written small mock articles for The Quibbler, which obviously have been shown to the world, but otherwise, I haven't really ever shown my creative writing to the world. Not that I've done much creative writing since leaving my teen ages behind me. It was Jo's books who ignited my creative side again... :hearts: Unless you count countless amounts of discussion posts in various discussion sites (not all about HP) all over the Internet for the last 15 years.  :ginny:

I also write, and have always done so, when I'm enough angry or upset. Partly because it works like a Pensieve and gives me the opportunity to lay my thoughts and what happened out and if possible spot other angles than my own or a logical chain of events that has hitherto escaped me. And partly, because it helps me express my point of view in a clear way without anyone interrupting. In 10 times out of 11 it helps a lot, and I might even loose some anger in the process. Especially since I learned never to put it in emails and hitting send until I've cooled down completely...  :fredgeorge: ... Which of course means that few of these things are ever read by more eyes than mine.  :harry:
« Last Edit: May 02, 2013, 07:17:02 PM by Evreka »
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May 03, 2013, 09:56:03 PM
Reply #28

varza

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Thanks ladies. I am always curious on what drives someone to write. I have been focused on school - I just haven't had the chance to work on my novel at all but I am taking the summer off and will be using that time to finish my book and clean it up to present in September at an agent meeting.

I don't know if this is the place to do it but I am attending a Writers Conference here in Denver in September and you don't have to be a member of the host group to go and I wanted to post it. Its pretty great - classes by professional writers on all types of topics and you can grab time with publishers/agents (thinking of what HealerOne said about how hard it is to find a publisher) and pitch ideas or your book. I am not even close to being finished but I am signed up to meet with an agent. I wanted to post the link here - its not cheap at all but it feels like it is worth it. I am also looking for a roommate if anyone wants to come and split costs that way.
https://www.rmfw.org/conference/
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May 04, 2013, 09:05:17 AM
Reply #29

Maraudingdon

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varza, who is the agent? I know quite a few and am happy to give you a heads up if I can. I'm assuming this is a face to face pitch? If so, remember to practice beforehand and have a one/two sentence blurb that will knock their socks off! GOOD LUCK!

My goal is to have a minimum of ten novels published in ebook and paperback form. I will then take some time away from writing to finish my degree. I'm about to publish my third ebook, and that same trilogy will be released in paperback form over the next year. My agent and I have been working on a four book YA fantasy series. One book is finished and we are just working out how to publish, and book two will be finished by the end of June. She and I also had a massive brainstorming email season last week, and we have come up with a YA contemporary premise which I will write during July-September! So that's eight of my ten books already devised/written/published!

I have so many ideas - all written down in my Hogwarts notebook! I just need a time-turner to help me write them.
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May 05, 2013, 09:43:51 AM
Reply #30

varza

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I won't know until I get there the morning of the conference. I put in a request for 5 different agents and I will be assigned one.
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May 11, 2013, 02:23:02 AM
Reply #31

HealerOne

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I took a big step ( in my eyes anyway!) this week - I registered the copy-write on my manuscript that I am trying to get Kindle ready. It's getting closer every day.  :flower:
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May 11, 2013, 10:58:10 AM
Reply #32

Evreka

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I took a big step ( in my eyes anyway!) this week - I registered the copy-write on my manuscript that I am trying to get Kindle ready. It's getting closer every day.  :flower:
It sounds fantastic, HealerOne!

Would you mind describing what it means? Is it the title that has been registered, or is the content submitted somewhere for this purpose or...?  :ron:
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May 11, 2013, 10:35:12 PM
Reply #33

Maraudingdon

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I took a big step ( in my eyes anyway!) this week - I registered the copy-write on my manuscript that I am trying to get Kindle ready. It's getting closer every day.  :flower:

Did you pay? Because you don't need to register copyright; it automatically becomes yours the second you put words down.

All you need for your Kindle manuscript is a dedicated page that states you have copyright to this work, and that the property contained therein cannot be reproduced without permission.

Author Camilla Chafer has a brilliant example of a copyright page for Kindle:

http://www.camillachafer.com/2011/07/how-to-format-kindle-ebooks-copyright-page.html

That said, it won't protect you unless you are prepared to litigate in the event of theft, and how many authors can afford to do that? My first ebook was copied by a piece of crap website within months of going on sale, along with tens of thousands of others. I only hope that the majority of readers do the decent moral thing and buy directly from the true distributor.

Food for thought for those publishing.



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May 12, 2013, 01:56:16 AM
Reply #34

varza

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Congrats! Always so many steps.

Post Merge: May 12, 2013, 02:09:46 AM
varza, who is the agent? I know quite a few and am happy to give you a heads up if I can. I'm assuming this is a face to face pitch? If so, remember to practice beforehand and have a one/two sentence blurb that will knock their socks off! GOOD LUCK!
I have no idea how to do a pitch. Trying to figure out if I want to pitch the story I am working on or something else? What do I bring with me? Full manuscript? A few pages? Can I take multiple items in? its only 10 minutes long: "Every attendee may register for one free ten-minute pitch appointment. We will do our best to accommodate your choice of agent or editor. You will receive your pitch appointment in your registration materials when you arrive at the conference"

These are the agents I requested to see 1 of

Sandra Bond
Hannah Bowman
and I think Kristen Nelson? (after you register, I can't find a record of who I requested


2 of them are local and the other is in New York. It is kind of sad, I had no clue there would actually be agents or publishers who were in Denver. I figured they would all be in New York for the US.

I am a bit freaking because I am horrible at selling myself. At least I have time to practice. I just wish I had someone to go with me to talk to at the end of the night or afterwards. Some of my fellow English Majors may be going but I don't know any of them that well.

BTW, I didn't win the writing contest I entered but I did have a One Act Play performed in my theatre class. Unfortunately, it wasn't chosen I just volunteered to write it. But the feedback was good - people thought the characters were believable and the dialogue was truthful.  My professor told me I should sign up for a play writing class because I had a talent for it.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2013, 02:09:46 AM by varza »
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May 12, 2013, 05:39:21 AM
Reply #35

HealerOne

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Evreka, The Copywrite process in the USA is for the entire content of the manuscript including the title. One does need to upload the entire manuscript to the website.

I took a big step ( in my eyes anyway!) this week - I registered the copy-write on my manuscript that I am trying to get Kindle ready. It's getting closer every day.  :flower:

Did you pay? Because you don't need to register copyright; it automatically becomes yours the second you put words down.

That said, it won't protect you unless you are prepared to litigate in the event of theft, and how many authors can afford to do that? My first ebook was copied by a piece of crap website within months of going on sale, along with tens of thousands of others. I only hope that the majority of readers do the decent moral thing and buy directly from the true distributor.

Yes I did pay a nominal fee. I did understand that my work was 'copywrited' just by being the work that I did in fact put down on paper! However I just thought it might be best to error on the 'safe side' (if there is one in this business!) BTW thanks for the reference. I am actually hoping to get this book out in more than one place Kindle, Nook, I pads etc. Still researching that ...
 
« Last Edit: May 12, 2013, 05:42:50 AM by HealerOne »
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May 12, 2013, 08:49:06 AM
Reply #36

Maraudingdon

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varza, this list of tips on how to pitch might help you:

http://carlywatters.com/2013/05/06/how-to-pitch-an-agent/

I know nothing about Sandra Bond, but Kristen Nelson is a big name agent and it is a great opportunity to pitch her. She focuses mainly on women's lit. What genre do you write? Hannah Bowman reps Young Adult from what I remember.

I know it's virtual, but if you want to practice your pitch with me via message form, I'm really happy to help you. You pitch your entire manuscript, but obviously condense it down, much like a query letter. Take a laptop or something similar with you, so if someone asks for your manuscript in full, you can email it straight away. Agents these days like to read in virtual form, but taking a few copies of the first three chapters might help. Make sure the ms is finished, and formatted to agent specifications.

I don't want to freak you out, but agents get 30-50,000 submissions a year, and will take on average five new clients from that. Making a great impression at a conference is such a good way to jump over those - like me - who had to go through the slush pile to get signed! But remember, you aren't selling yourself, you are selling the book you have written. An agent needs to be intrigued enough to want to read it, and then they need to fall in love with it enough to want to represent it. They will expect you to be nervous, so don't worry about that either.
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May 14, 2013, 08:51:16 PM
Reply #37

varza

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Thank you and I will probably take you up on that offer as we get closer to the date. Right now I am having a huge debate in my head about what I want to do. Do I finish what I have been working on for almost a year or go with a YA series I have in my head (kinda a more modern SVH type) or go with one of my many started but unfinished sci-fi/fantasy items? Or do I write as much as I can - get what I can get done and have several things ready to pitch depending on the Agent I get to meet with?

I am thinking of setting up a separate writing email account where I could go and send my manuscripts to and have them prepped to send out from there. Instead of having it mixed in with my generic email or school email accounts.

But right now the biggest thing is to get back into writing. I took a few months off to focus on school work and all the papers going on there (so I was still writing just not my on my fiction).  :hermioneread: but I have just been a mess this first part of the year. I think I need to print some things out and figure out which piece is my strongest and go from there.
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May 14, 2013, 11:51:18 PM
Reply #38

ss19

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I took a big step ( in my eyes anyway!) this week - I registered the copy-write on my manuscript that I am trying to get Kindle ready. It's getting closer every day.  :flower:

Did you pay? Because you don't need to register copyright; it automatically becomes yours the second you put words down.

All you need for your Kindle manuscript is a dedicated page that states you have copyright to this work, and that the property contained therein cannot be reproduced without permission.

Author Camilla Chafer has a brilliant example of a copyright page for Kindle:

http://www.camillachafer.com/2011/07/how-to-format-kindle-ebooks-copyright-page.html

That said, it won't protect you unless you are prepared to litigate in the event of theft, and how many authors can afford to do that? My first ebook was copied by a piece of crap website within months of going on sale, along with tens of thousands of others. I only hope that the majority of readers do the decent moral thing and buy directly from the true distributor.

Food for thought for those publishing.
It's true that you automatically own the copyright to your writing without having to register the copyright, but there's a big difference between registering and not registering.

I'm not a writer but I do some photography as a hobby and I earn money from selling some of my photographs (not much but enough to pay for my expensive professional camera and other photography equipment which I wouldn't be able to afford otherwise).  One of the decisions I had to make when I first started selling my photographs was whether or not it was worth the cost and effort to formally register the copyright on them since they're not worth as much as ones taken by professional photographers.

My understanding is that if we do not register the copyright on our writing or photos, if and when copyright infringement happens, all we can do is to ask the perpetrator to stop the copyright infringement.  For example, if someone steals one of my pictures and posts it on their website, I can ask them to take down that picture - that's basically all I can do.  If they steal my picture and have sold it many times by the time I find out, I cannot try to recover the profits from them.  You need to have registered the copyright before you can file an infringement case in court.  Also, if you register the copyright after the fact, after the infringement already occurred, you can only sue for actual damages, not for statutory damages nor for any legal costs you might incur.  So you basically lose some of the copyright protection if you don't register it formally.

I'm referring to the US copyright law though, and I don't know how these laws might differ in other countries.  However, I would assume that if you're an Australian author but sell your books in the US, the US copyright law would apply to you as well.  If anyone wants to confirm what I wrote above with the US Copyright Office, there's an explanation here on their website, starting on page 7 of this document: http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf.

If I were the author of a book series that's as popular as The Return to Camelot triology, I would definitely want to look into registering the copyright on the books to make sure I get the full copyright protection, especially if you already saw people infringing on the copyright, as you say, within months of the first ebook going on sale.  I think the current fee for registering online is $35, which really isn't much at all considering what's at stake here, in my opinion.
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May 16, 2013, 09:56:11 PM
Reply #39

HeleneB

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Woohoo to HealerOne. That is a huge step. I know some people are okay with the automatic copyright while others want to have the government's stamp of verification. I'd call that the pillow factor--whatever lets you sleep at night.  :fredgeorge:
Author of the Safe Harbors series and "Second Chances 101", a Ripple Effect Romance.
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