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Author Topic: The Writer's Round Table  (Read 12335 times)

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May 19, 2013, 05:24:45 PM
Reply #40

Evreka

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I'm referring to the US copyright law though, and I don't know how these laws might differ in other countries.  However, I would assume that if you're an Australian author but sell your books in the US, the US copyright law would apply to you as well.  If anyone wants to confirm what I wrote above with the US Copyright Office, there's an explanation here on their website, starting on page 7 of this document: http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf.
:stars: Thanks for this information, ss19! While I have nothing to register, I have always been interested in how the copyrights work (although my understanding is fuzzy at best) , so this post of yours explained a great deal!  ;D

My interest stems firstly from a photographic point of view, too, though I've never sold any (or tried to), but because I don't want to risk that anyone else would earn money from my photos, the bulk of them are nowhere on the Internet.  Secondly from trying to find out the appropriate rules when I was setting up my website, thirdly from trying to understand the many turns in the Rowling/Vander Ark case years ago and finally from trying to keep a couple of people IRL from quoting full news articles in a work they intended to publish... (which is not a great idea in Sweden).
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May 19, 2013, 11:37:43 PM
Reply #41

varza

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I never knew you could register. Do agents do things like that if you have one or should you do it on your own?

So, I decided what I am going to do for my pitch session... I am going to go the YA route. I have a story started and have had it in mind for almost a decade now. Its a first book for a series kind of similar to SVH. Maybe it is outdated but I want to explore and write about a lot of the crap that happened to me as a teen (talk about drama to pull from!). It also seems like it may be the best way to go. I believe all the agents I have signed up for are open to YA books as well as others. I already have the location for the center of the story (its a lake that I used to go to growing up on Spring Breaks and summer then spread from there) and the main few characters. I am a bit surprised but I have so many stories in my head and with notes that I took the last week to sort thru and this is where I kept ending up. I have another series I would love to write but its complete fantasy and has a ton of fighting - not something I am super secure writing about yet.

Question - how do you change from first to third or second person? I am in first person at the moment but I think it would be better as third or second.

Post Merge: May 20, 2013, 07:35:05 PM
Just had a friend stop by to drop off something my husband and totally stomp all over my dream. We were talking about the conference in September and he started telling me it was a waste of time trying to get an agent and they aren't going to care whatever I try and sell them. Feeling like total crap right now. I don't know why but part of my dream of become an author includes having an agent and standing there w a physical book in my spent my blood, sweat n tears on but its mine. I don't feel like just not even trying to get an agent just because its difficult... I don't really need someone telling me as I am starting a novel that what I am planning is a waste of time - he told me to skip the pitch session because its a scam that all the agent cares about is the check they are getting from the conference. I guess he worked at script writing cattle calls in LA and feels ashamed about it. I mean seriously - I am a college student, full time mom and trying to write. And I am supposed to come up with the time to self advertise my self-published book? I barely made it thru this last semester and I didn't even get to write. I had planned on writing this afternoon (I actually got a chapter written last night in my YA book) but now I keep crying when I look at the screen. Feel like my friends don't believe I can do this...
« Last Edit: May 20, 2013, 11:02:54 PM by varza »
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May 23, 2013, 09:03:51 PM
Reply #42

Evreka

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Just had a friend stop by to drop off something my husband and totally stomp all over my dream. We were talking about the conference in September and he started telling me it was a waste of time trying to get an agent and they aren't going to care whatever I try and sell them. Feeling like total crap right now. I don't know why but part of my dream of become an author includes having an agent and standing there w a physical book in my spent my blood, sweat n tears on but its mine. I don't feel like just not even trying to get an agent just because its difficult... I don't really need someone telling me as I am starting a novel that what I am planning is a waste of time - he told me to skip the pitch session because its a scam that all the agent cares about is the check they are getting from the conference. I guess he worked at script writing cattle calls in LA and feels ashamed about it. I mean seriously - I am a college student, full time mom and trying to write. And I am supposed to come up with the time to self advertise my self-published book? I barely made it thru this last semester and I didn't even get to write. I had planned on writing this afternoon (I actually got a chapter written last night in my YA book) but now I keep crying when I look at the screen. Feel like my friends don't believe I can do this...
varza...  :bear: Reading this there are a few things I'd like to say, but please keep in mind that when it comes to facts about publishing I know nothing. Still, I like to say the following:

1) Ultimately, if you want to write books, or at all spend time writing things; the most important thing is this (I think): It doesn't matter whether your friends, neighbours, family members or strangers believe you can do this - it does matter what YOU believe you can do. You will always meet people who will tell you that you will never be able to reach your dreams - and that's regardless of what those dreams are! There will always be people who will tell you to do something in a different way than you had planned to, but not all of them will necessarily say so because it is sound advice for you. Even when it is sound advice generally, it might not be so in your situation. And many times it might just be what that other person happens to believe in, or because they have old sour grapes.

2) Even if you are writing on something as great as HP, you are going to get rejects from agents and publishers. Jo Rowling got those, for crying it out loud!  ???  It seems to happen to everyone! Unless you, yourself, believe in your work, others won't. Even if you DO believe in it, it's going to be a bumpy road. You can't let others opinions discourage you, especially not this early on before you've actually tried.

3) On the description above your friend doesn't sound like one.  >:( They come across as someone who takes out their own disappointments (or prejudices) on you. I wouldn't take their advices as the Law of things, unless you have very definite reasons to be sure of them knowing all about these things AND honestly being in for advising you as best they can. And even so, I'd probably go for second opinions.

4) All that said, you are going to meet rejections as an author, and saying that it shouldn't stop you is a lot easier than dealing with it, of course.  I guess what I am trying to say is to not give up hope because one person don't like your chosen route to reach your goal.  :bear:
« Last Edit: May 23, 2013, 09:06:31 PM by Evreka »
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May 24, 2013, 12:30:51 PM
Reply #43

Maraudingdon

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varza, what your "friend" said was cruel and unnecessary. If your dream is to write and publish a book, then don't you EVER let go of that dream. Write because you love it, because you are incomplete without it. If YOU believe you can do it, then no one else matters.

A reality check though, if you do write a book, and you do get an agent, and you do get a publisher, don't think for one second you won't have to find the time to publicise it. The budgets for publishing promotion these days are non-existent. I had a friend publish a novel via Simon & Schuster  a few years ago. They did nothing to help her, and the book sank without a trace. These days, regardless of how you publish, the pressure is on the author to do the hard graft.

But that is in your future. When you pitch to an agent, make sure the novel is finished. That's your first step. Try and write every day. Revise and revise the story before the conference, and just take each step at a time.

And you will get rejected. That's just a fact of publishing. But the stat I give people is I received 124 rejections before signing with my agent after 7 offers. You only need one to say yes.

To answer your question about voice - never ever write in second person. That's reserved for instruction booklets. If you are writing YA, the preferred voice is first person. As you type, read it aloud. Pretend you are the character and you are voicing the story. So everything is "I"...

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May 24, 2013, 08:20:38 PM
Reply #44

HeleneB

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Finally getting caught up on this thread.

I've found that--for me--the real writing happens when I edit. And I can't edit something I haven't finished. That's one of the things I love about NaNoWriMo--National Novel Writing Month (I know this doesn't work for Maraudingdon). You have to turn off that internal editor in order to crank out 50,000 words in 30 days. I'm getting better at that. Last November I beat NaNo in 18 days. The reality is that my rough draft is really my outline. But everyone is different and has to find out what works for them. The key is to write.

I really do admire those that manage NaNo. I would love to be able to word vomit, but I just can't! Doing it in 18 days is just outstanding, Eleni. Your keyboard must have been smoking.

Writers find their own groove, but I have to edit continously. The plus side is by the time I write THE END, a manuscript is in pretty decent condition already. The downside is that I can only manage a chapter a week of fresh writing, because I am constantly going back to previous chapters to tidy up.

I'm an OCD writer!
What really helped my word count was using the Dragon speech software. It almost doubled what I was able to do during sprints.

MaraudingDon, you are proof that some people just have to outline. And that's awesome. I expected that I would be one of those since I'm so organized in other aspects of my life, but when I sit down to a computer it doesn't happen that way. I've reached the conclusion that I really am an outliner--it just happens to be that 50,000+ word first draft.  :fredgeorge:

Oh yeah! I have it saved on my computer. It was just a copy I printed out. I have no idea where it even ended up. As long as one of the garbage men doesn't steal it. :D
I don't just save it on my computer; I email it to myself. If it's a long day of writing, I may email it to myself several times. Yeah, I'm paranoid. And for good reason, considering the horror stories I've heard of last manuscripts when computers crash.

Okay, I have a question because I am currently reading about how writing changed after WW2 in the US and how people were writing to write the definitive book about a topic and write a best seller. There are all types of writers out there and I was wondering what is your goal with your writing? Do you want to write a classic novel? Write and publish lots of books? and so on...
I'm writing to entertain me and because I love it. If I happen to entertain someone else, all the better.

Just had a friend stop by to drop off something my husband and totally stomp all over my dream. We were talking about the conference in September and he started telling me it was a waste of time trying to get an agent and they aren't going to care whatever I try and sell them. Feeling like total crap right now. I don't know why but part of my dream of become an author includes having an agent and standing there w a physical book in my spent my blood, sweat n tears on but its mine. I don't feel like just not even trying to get an agent just because its difficult... I don't really need someone telling me as I am starting a novel that what I am planning is a waste of time - he told me to skip the pitch session because its a scam that all the agent cares about is the check they are getting from the conference. I guess he worked at script writing cattle calls in LA and feels ashamed about it. I mean seriously - I am a college student, full time mom and trying to write. And I am supposed to come up with the time to self advertise my self-published book? I barely made it thru this last semester and I didn't even get to write. I had planned on writing this afternoon (I actually got a chapter written last night in my YA book) but now I keep crying when I look at the screen. Feel like my friends don't believe I can do this...
Sometimes friends can be the least supportive. I'm not always sure why that is the case. It could be jealousy or bitterness. I think it says more about the person who says something like that than it does about the person they say it to. And there's plenty of support online.

But you have a choice now. Are you going to let that "friend" crush your dreams? I hope you don't. I'm always inspired by Ira Glass's comments on creativity:

Click here.


ETA: A writer friend of mine, did an excellent post on this. Check it out.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2013, 09:17:08 PM by Eleni »
Author of the Safe Harbors series and "Second Chances 101", a Ripple Effect Romance.
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May 25, 2013, 04:35:01 AM
Reply #45

pleshette

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varza, I echo the advice from MaraudingDon and Eleni. If writing is your dream, make it happen. It's that simple (or hard, depending on how you look at it). Don't let anyone say you can't. If writing is your passion, what makes you happy, then how dare anyone say it's not a worthy pursuit. But it's up to you. I work, have 4 kids (3 are teens), I'm nearing the half century mark and I write YA literature, with the hope that one day I'll be published. Why? Because I love to read it, discuss it, and write it. Am I delusional in thinking that some day I will be published? Maybe, if I constantly dwelled on the odds that are against me. But you know what? I don't care what people think. And my kids? They think it's cool (when they  notice, lol) that Mom spends her free time working on something she loves to do. Trust me. There are days when I think "Why bother? I'm swimming upstream." But until I lose the joy I experience when a new idea comes along or when I'm proud of how a scene is written, I'll keep on writing.

As far as what tense to write in, MaraudingDon is right when she says that second tense is practically nonexistent in YA lit. First or third is preferred. Much of YA is written in first, to really get inside the MC's head, but really it depends on the writer. There are plenty of YA novels written in third person. I write in third because it's what I'm most comfortable with and what I prefer reading. My advice would be to experiment with both.  :)

One more thing. The writing community is extremely supportive. Seek it out if you haven't already. There are so many blogs by writers,  both published and unpublished, and agents to learn the business side of things as well as craft. When you need a boost, it helps when you know that others struggle with the same issues. I'd be happy to point you to few to get you started if you're interested. Just drop me a PM if you'd like. :hedwig:
« Last Edit: May 25, 2013, 01:19:11 PM by pleshette »
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May 25, 2013, 05:00:51 AM
Reply #46

HealerOne

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varza, I almost cried when I read your post. How dare your 'friend' step on your dreams! I agree with everyone else here. Just keep your head  up and your fingers on the typewriter! Don't give up. Just keep plugging away. I also want to say that as you go through your writing journey ( you may wish to kick me at this point!) you may change your mind as to publishing with an agent. The book business is changing so much! The business may change even more than we can foresee, so keep up with those changes and try to keep an open mind. I guess all of us would like the ideal of getting an agent and having a hard copy of our very own published work, but don't let that dream limit what you do ... just saying. The sky is the limit, not an agent ... just saying.

The other thing I have to say is that being part of a writing group (Currently there are only 4 in my group) has helped me a huge amount! I just advertised that I was starting a group at the senior center I frequent. I was afraid no one would come but here we are - still helping  each other through the rigors of writing.   I am sure you could easily start a group at your school. Give it a try and I think you would really benefit from having some other like minded people to bounce things off of. You Go Girl!
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May 27, 2013, 09:00:17 AM
Reply #47

varza

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My friend and I talked. He was worried that the conference I was going to was going to be like the screenwriting cattle calls they do in LA. Giving lots of hope and nothing ever pans out from it. Just a lot of stolen ideas.
But that is in your future. When you pitch to an agent, make sure the novel is finished. That's your first step. Try and write every day. Revise and revise the story before the conference, and just take each step at a time.

And you will get rejected. That's just a fact of publishing. But the stat I give people is I received 124 rejections before signing with my agent after 7 offers. You only need one to say yes.
Thank you.  I kinda feel like if when I receive my first rejection letter - it'll be a sign of my first step as becoming a professional writer after writing the story.
Quote
To answer your question about voice - never ever write in second person. That's reserved for instruction booklets. If you are writing YA, the preferred voice is first person. As you type, read it aloud. Pretend you are the character and you are voicing the story. So everything is "I"...
Okay, good. I am writing in first person and its been going really well. As of write now (pun intended) I am aiming for about 70K (280 pages) for my word count and I just broke 13K in just over a week. I started writing chapter 2 last Monday (I wrote the first chapter years ago) and tonight just finished Chp 5. I just hope I can keep up the moment. My brain is getting a bit tired and the house really needs to a big organization/cleaning session.
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June 04, 2013, 08:00:35 AM
Reply #48

varza

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Just checking to see how everyone's writing it coming. I am about 12,000 words from the 1/2 way point on my story. I decided at that point to print then do a base edit to make sure I like where the story is going and that I have all the info I need on the characters (the life of a pantser writer) and areas I need to flesh out and make sure things are consistent. I am going on vacation next week - New Orleans minus the boy with my hubby so I won't be taking my computer just the print out and my spiral for my notes.

Any tips for editing? I am nervous about how well the writing has been going, its just coming out of my head and I am writing every moment I can get. Actually got pissy with my husband on Saturday because I hadn't written in a few days due to a convention in town. I wanted to go home and write but I was too exhausted to.  :madeye:
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June 04, 2013, 10:40:32 AM
Reply #49

Maraudingdon

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Awesome job, varza:bravo:

I edit as I go. So by the time I get to the end of a first draft, the first three quarters are already really tight. I  :hearts: editing, because that's where the story really starts to flesh out. There is nothing more satisfying than going through a chapter for the hundredth time, and realising there is nothing left to change.

I think other writers would probably agree with me, in that each writer is different, and so what works for one, doesn't work for another. So just go with your gut feeling and work on your writing in a way that works for you. There isn't a right or wrong way, but the editing is where the hard work starts. I would also start thinking about getting some critique partners to keep you on the straight and narrow.

My WIP is at 66,000 words. I think two or three more chapters and I can send it off to my agent. It's the sequel to another series I will publish, probably starting next year. It's about time-travelling devils.

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June 06, 2013, 07:35:15 AM
Reply #50

varza

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Wow! You are just writing like crazy! I have been stuck the past few days and struggling to get words written but I have been spending more time getting my house in order before we leave town since I will be gone for three weeks. Decided earlier that I don't care what the count is on Tuesday, it is time to print and edit. I like to edit by hand then going back in with the prompts. Not that I have done a ton of editing before.

Yeah, the readers are the issue. I am not sure who to use at this point. Will be checking it out soon.
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June 07, 2013, 04:03:02 AM
Reply #51

HealerOne

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(My current novel in process >) I'm finding that I write a chapter or even a scene and then take it to my writing group. We read to each other and then give positive feedback. It's a great way to write! You can then rewrite and edit after their criticism. I agree with Maraudingdon that editing is toughest part of writing but it also exposes the weaker parts of what you have  written. It gives you a time to really tighten up the text and gives you the opportunity to see whether you have written what you meant to write! (< Does that make sense? You get to look at the text and see whether what you wrote really conveys all the emotions and feelings that you want the reader to go through ...)

(The novel that is all ready to get published - well sort of  ;) ...>)I am finding the process of getting the text ready for publishing is much more difficult than I thought! I know part of the problem is that I do so poorly in using WORD. If I had set up my parameters better when I started writing the manuscript, the process sure would have been easier. (I swear I think I reformatted that entire document six times!) My next hurdle is the cover. Yikes! I feel like this is one of the most important things in this e-book market so I am thinking about using a web site that specializes in covers to make it.  Anyone have experience with this?
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June 07, 2013, 06:56:45 AM
Reply #52

varza

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See this is where I feel like an amatuer - format? Is there a particular format I am supposed to be writing in? I am just writing in the standard format in WORD. Maybe I should transfer over to my script program - they have a selection for writing a novel.

I don't belong to a writers group... I am so paranoid, I feel weird about going into a group and sharing my work before its done. I have heard so many horror stories about ideas and stuff being stolen from other people.
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June 07, 2013, 09:30:45 PM
Reply #53

Maraudingdon

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HealerOne, my twopenneth is really take your time with the formatting. I spent six months formatting SEARCHING FOR ARTHUR for KDP, and I've spent eight months formatting it for paperback release. I know authors who have finished a manuscript on the Monday, and have then rushed to publish by the Friday, and then they wonder why people complain when mistakes are found. It is laborious learning the process, but the first format is always the worst. I think I've already linked to my step by step guide for KDP formatting, but I am always happy to help with questions.

I would ABSOLUTELY recommend a professional cover. I use Design For Writers in the UK. We collaborate until its perfect, and then Andrew will email me the cover in various formats: KDP, 3D, large, medium, small etc. But shop around and get some quotes and always check back catalogues for examples.


Can I just stress to anyone looking at publishing, DO NOT CUT CORNERS. Unless you are planning on giving your work away for free, you must treat this as a business, even if you won't make much money from it - I certainly don't!! You have to be professional, have patience to learn the craft, and offer a product that is value for money.
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June 07, 2013, 11:21:58 PM
Reply #54

varza

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Quote
My next hurdle is the cover. Yikes! I feel like this is one of the most important things in this e-book market so I am thinking about using a web site that specializes in covers to make it.  Anyone have experience with this?
It makes me glad I already know quite a few artists whose work I love. Do you know anyone who is an artist? And I agree with MaraudingDon - covers are important. While I don't judge the book by them, I do overlook books that are so basic that its just the title and a background color. Feels like no effort was put into it.

So the formatting is for the Kindle? I have formatted before for a few cafepress books I edited and published through there. It was a PIA.

Writing going better today - I think the thing I was struggling with is the event that was happening in my book. Wasn't sure if it should be there but I put it in and is now part of the story for the rest of the book. (Had my main girls' enemy go missing and was found with a broken back. she is struggling with caring about someone who has been so hateful to her and being a good friend to her friends who are related to her in some way but at the same time not wanting to care).
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June 18, 2013, 01:41:52 AM
Reply #55

HeleneB

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New York Times bestselling author David Farland has writing tips he calls his Daily Kick in the Pants. It's not really daily, but you can sign up for emails. He doesn't spam. He had a whole series he did on covers. Here's the first one.

I've got an author friend who has self-published several books. They're wonderful stories, but I think her covers are killing her sales. I don't have the nerve to tell her that because she likes them.

Something to consider with covers is the fact that so many books are purchased online anymore, and your cover (and the writing) has to be clear in a thumbnail. I see so many books where I can't read the title or the author's name on the thumbnai.
Author of the Safe Harbors series and "Second Chances 101", a Ripple Effect Romance.
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June 18, 2013, 09:14:10 AM
Reply #56

Maraudingdon

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I've got an author friend who has self-published several books. They're wonderful stories, but I think her covers are killing her sales. I don't have the nerve to tell her that because she likes them.

Something to consider with covers is the fact that so many books are purchased online anymore, and your cover (and the writing) has to be clear in a thumbnail. I see so many books where I can't read the title or the author's name on the thumbnai.

I think I know who you're talking about. Would her initials be L.J? If so, you should tell her because they are some of the worst covers I have ever seen. I don't even bother reading the blurb.

I completely agree about the thumbnail image. I interviewed my designer for my blog and he had some great views on covers:

http://musingsofapennilesswriter.blogspot.com.au/2013/05/the-spirit-of-nimue-release-tour-day-one.html

His suggestions may help.

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June 18, 2013, 10:00:16 AM
Reply #57

Kickassnoodle

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When I was a youngster, I liked to imagine stories in my head whenever I was bored or stuck somewhere such as waiting for the bus or for an appointment. 
Like ss19 I've always liked to imagine stories in my head, and am in fact still doing this in spare moments. When I have an intriguing idea I can pursue it in my head and consider what would happen next, the choices my imaginary people will make and where it would lead them, occasionally dreaming up full conversations between them. I haven't, however, tried to write any of this down and am far from sure I would be able to.
Man, I thought I was the only, erm, grown-up person making up stories in my head like that :fredgeorge: It started when I was like 11 and had just read the first HP book - I created spin-offs and fanfiction stories sometimes spanning years, entirely in my head. I would sometimes write bits and pieces of it down when I got stuck for whatever reason. I thought I'd grow out of it, but I haven't. I've just moved onto different fictional worlds and original stories.

To make matters even worse, I'm writing in some kind of English (out of respect for the language, I'm not going to pretend it's really English, I'm writing!) - and I'm learning something new almost every day.
The novel is almost done! Some language issues has to be settled, or I'll translate into Danish (my language) and work on from there! I'm not sure, and it's a bit sad, if I can't go all the way in English! ...
That is actually another reason why I haven't tried to write my stories down. For some reason that I can no longer remember how it started, or why, or when... I nowadays tend to imagine my stories in English or "some kind of it" as T-Dane put it.  :harry: And if I was really seeking to write any of them down, the most reasonable approach would be to write in Swedish, the one language in the world that I truly master. And where my vocabulary knows no boundaries. However... the stories are all in English....  :o
Again, this happens to me too! This is so bizarre :fredgeorge: I actually tried writing a story, that I initially 'dreamed up' in English, in English (for NaNoWriMo), but it didn't work, even though I speak English freely and have no trouble with scientific writing, but fiction is a different beast entirely. Trying to write that story I just felt so clumsy and it felt so artificial, it was no fun at all (I guess, if I had persevered I'd have gotten better at it). So, for another NaNo I decided to get over it and write it in my native language. Once I got started it was pretty easy, except that I just couldn't translate/change a main character's name because it has just the right ring to it in English, but not my native tongue, so I opted to write it out phonetically (sort of) but it looks weird - I still haven't decided what to do about it, maybe I'll just suppress whatever feelings I have and do a 'replace all' with it one day and won't look back.

The aforementioned story remains my first and only finished novel draft. I wrote it for NaNoWriMo 2011 and haven't touched it since. It needs editing desperately but I just don't know what I want to do with it - right now, it's a magical realism/detective story mess, I feel like I should either get rid of the detective element seeing as I did little-to-no research on it (so it's pretty terrible, though I'd have to think of another device to tell the story) or do the research and get rid of the magical realism element (though I think it's one of the best parts). I never did much editing on my fiction before - most of it is short stories and one-act plays, I would edit as I wrote (or sometimes I would just put it all together and change it in my head until it sounded good to me and then just write it down, very little editing needed). So, a whole novel to edit is a very daunting prospect.

I study and work in science, so over the past few years I've mostly written scientific stuff (apart from the two NaNo attempts and one ScriptFrenzy) and while I love it, I want to write fiction again as well, because I've somehow accumulated a lot of thoughts and ideas in my head and they keep knocking to get out.

Oh, and I love the question about inspiration :luna: A lot of different things inspire me to write. Whenever I finish a book or see a play that has a profound effect on me, I always start creating (often as a sort of personal perspective on the themes of those books/plays), it's just a matter of keeping momentum (which I most often don't succeed at). Watching Vlogbrothers videos also inspire me to create. Those are general creative inspirations which I need more than idea-inspirations because the latter just pop up as I go about my daily life and think, but I sometimes need reminding that it's worth working on it even if you don't share it with many people or think it's not good enough or whatever, I also sometimes often need something to get me out of a lazy spell :ashamed:

New York Times bestselling author David Farland has writing tips he calls his Daily Kick in the Pants. It's not really daily, but you can sign up for emails. He doesn't spam.
Oh, just from the title, Daily Kick in the Pants sounds like something that could help me a great deal  :fredgeorge: thanks for the link.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2013, 10:54:29 AM by Kickassnoodle »
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June 18, 2013, 02:11:50 PM
Reply #58

HeleneB

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When I was a youngster, I liked to imagine stories in my head whenever I was bored or stuck somewhere such as waiting for the bus or for an appointment. 
Like ss19 I've always liked to imagine stories in my head, and am in fact still doing this in spare moments. When I have an intriguing idea I can pursue it in my head and consider what would happen next, the choices my imaginary people will make and where it would lead them, occasionally dreaming up full conversations between them. I haven't, however, tried to write any of this down and am far from sure I would be able to.
Man, I thought I was the only, erm, grown-up person making up stories in my head like that :fredgeorge: It started when I was like 11 and had just read the first HP book - I created spin-offs and fanfiction stories sometimes spanning years, entirely in my head. I would sometimes write bits and pieces of it down when I got stuck for whatever reason. I thought I'd grow out of it, but I haven't. I've just moved onto different fictional worlds and original stories.


Nope. I've kept myself company for decades with my little stories. So much more satisfying to put them on paper. lol

Yeah, MaraudingDon, that's the author. Wonderful stories. Her books are very well done--except those covers.
Author of the Safe Harbors series and "Second Chances 101", a Ripple Effect Romance.
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June 18, 2013, 09:29:45 PM
Reply #59

Evreka

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Like ss19 I've always liked to imagine stories in my head, and am in fact still doing this in spare moments. When I have an intriguing idea I can pursue it in my head and consider what would happen next, the choices my imaginary people will make and where it would lead them, occasionally dreaming up full conversations between them. I haven't, however, tried to write any of this down and am far from sure I would be able to.
Man, I thought I was the only, erm, grown-up person making up stories in my head like that :fredgeorge: It started when I was like 11 and had just read the first HP book - I created spin-offs and fanfiction stories sometimes spanning years, entirely in my head. I would sometimes write bits and pieces of it down when I got stuck for whatever reason. I thought I'd grow out of it, but I haven't. I've just moved onto different fictional worlds and original stories.
Nope. I've kept myself company for decades with my little stories. So much more satisfying to put them on paper. lol
One of Sweden's most famous authors' for children Astrid Lindgren (who died in 2002) became 94 years old. I remember a TV interview she gave when she was well over 80, possibly for her 85th birthday or something like it(?), in which she described how she was still dreaming up stories in her head and considering what would happen next to the people in them. As she described it, I recognized my own sort of story fantasies.  :hug: So, dreaming up stories and pursuing them in your head is not just for kids. I think we're in good company!  :fredgeorge:
« Last Edit: June 18, 2013, 09:32:57 PM by Evreka »
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