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Author Topic: Chapter Four  (Read 669 times)

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April 15, 2013, 02:27:27 AM

atschpe

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Chapter Four
Over Hill and Under Hill

Well rested our adventures start up the Misy Mountain, following the path Elrond and Gandalf thought best. Before long a storm forces them to seek shelter in a cave. But oh dear, the sleeping adventurers are surprised by Goblins kidnapping them and their ponies through a crack in the wall. Only Gandalf manages to slip past unseen. A long winding path later they find themselves questioned as to their presences. A flash of a sword and a disembodied voice later they find themselves following Gandalf. But oh dear, Dori, the dwarf carrying Bilbo, drops him on his head and leaves him behind unconscious.

Pondery Points:

  • Gandalf manages to get away and help the others escape from the Goblins. What do you think of his timing and choice of action?
  • The Orcist sword, the Goblin Cleaver. What makes an object suddenly more frightening, despite who is wielding it? Do you think it holds properties of a previous or initial owner? Magic? Or is it but the fear of the name itself?
  • We see dwarves, goblins, a hobbit and a wizard interacting in this chapter. How do their actions and characteristics compare?
« Last Edit: April 16, 2013, 03:09:10 AM by atschpe »


"Of course it is all in your head, but why on Earth should that mean it isn't real?" ~Dumbledore (DH)
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April 16, 2013, 07:40:31 PM
Reply #1

Evreka

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This was the first chapter that I thought was quite fun to read!  :harry:

The story picks up, here is some action at last, Bilbo and friends are in peril and - the first cliff-hanger between chapters! Poor Bilbo, what will happen now? And what happens to Dori?! Was either of them recaptured? We're clueless until we read on, I like that!  :hermioneread:

Of course it's a bit too trusting of this company to don't have 2 people (or at least 1) as a look-out all through the night, switching with each other. What if the Trolls had found them? Or Goblins happened upon them (presumably from the mouth of the cave), or a bear had returned home or... any number of things could have happenned!  :madeye: They could do with some more vigilance, don't you think? ;)

Gandalf manages to get away and help the others escape from the Goblins. What do you think of his timing and choice of action?
He is by far the fastest of the lot, and possibly the only one to fully appreciate the potential troubles ahead. I think it makes sense that he has time to act, given Bilbo's warning. And a good thing it is, as otherwise no one could have helped them.

The Orcist sword, the Goblin Cleaver. What makes an object suddenly more frightening, despite who is wielding it? Do you think it holds properties of a previous or initial owner? Magic? Or is it but the fear of the name itself?
I think that certain weapons can become so terrible everyone fears them by their names, because history shows how many has been slain by them. And so the fear they spread becomes even more powerful than the weapon as such, partly because the enemies fears it so much. And then this particular weapon also glows near Goblins, meaning anyone wielding it is warned in advance of their approaching, which of course also makes the wielder a further advance.

But then again this is a fantasy tale, and as well as glowing, these swords might be magical in their deadliness as well, for all we know at this point in the story anyway.

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April 27, 2013, 06:11:44 PM
Reply #2

ss19

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I was shocked at how readily Gandalf killed those goblins without hesitation.  I don't mean shocked at his powers, but shocked at his violence.  At this point in the story, I didn't know enough about the goblins to know whether they deserved to die, I'll admit, and maybe Gandalf knows something I don't and knows that those goblins deserved to die.  Nonetheless, it was shocking to me the way he did it without asking any questions, since in this case Gandalf and company were the intruders invading the goblins' cave uninvited.  I mean he could have disarmed them or knocked them out without killling them, couldn't he?  Death is irreversible if later he finds out that those goblins didn't need to be killed.
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May 04, 2013, 01:53:03 AM
Reply #3

HealerOne

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I was shocked at how readily Gandalf killed those goblins without hesitation.  I don't mean shocked at his powers, but shocked at his violence.  At this point in the story, I didn't know enough about the goblins to know whether they deserved to die, I'll admit, and maybe Gandalf knows something I don't and knows that those goblins deserved to die.  Nonetheless, it was shocking to me the way he did it without asking any questions, since in this case Gandalf and company were the intruders invading the goblins' cave uninvited.  I mean he could have disarmed them or knocked them out without killling them, couldn't he?  Death is irreversible if later he finds out that those goblins didn't need to be killed.
I'm not so sure we should feel so bad for the Goblins. Gandalf knew about them. He was aware that they ate ponies and were merciless with their hostages. Later in the chapter they are described as 'cruel, wicked and bad-hearted'. Not exactly a stellar referral. Gandalf also knew they held a deep grudge against the Dwarves because of the last wars.

As  for the swords, I do think they had been magically 'enchanted' to recognize Goblins and attack on their own before the dwarves actually knew what was happening - maybe the Dwarves were not as fast as the Goblins, so the swords gave them an edge against them.  Having been used against the Goblins in the past, they surely would understand that this was something to be feared.

Now as far as Alchemy goes, again this is a chapter that Bilbo longs for the things in the past. The lightning and flashes of light are still part of the fire of Calcination. But Bilbo doesn't want to totally let go of the Hobbit he was in the past. Here we see water brought into the chemical formula, but it isn't able to totally wash away the ashes of Bilbo's past because he hasn't let go of those things which must be burned away from him !  So my feeling is that Dissolution may have begun but it certainly isn't effective.
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