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Author Topic: Chapter Seven  (Read 1055 times)

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April 28, 2013, 02:56:20 PM

atschpe

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Chapter Seven
Queer Lodging

Ever stayed with a Bear-Man? Well, that's where our adventurers are headed next. Gandalf stages their arrival carefully, having them appear in twos and threes so as not to startle the big man. So good in fact that they are welcome to stay, rest up and prepare for the next part of their journey, Mirkwood.
Once rested and replenished it is time to move on. They may take ponies to the border of Mirkwood, yet from there they have to travel on foot. Can I stay in the great hall instead?

Pondery Points:
  • Gandalf announces he will leave the adventurers soon. How did you feel when you first read this? Why now in the journey?
  • What did you make of Gandalf's plan to have the adventurers trickle in as he recounts his sotry to Beon?
  • Beon – half bear – half man, with many animals serving him. How did this fit in the character scheme for you?
« Last Edit: April 29, 2013, 09:21:20 AM by atschpe »


"Of course it is all in your head, but why on Earth should that mean it isn't real?" ~Dumbledore (DH)
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May 04, 2013, 04:43:39 PM
Reply #1

Evreka

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This is an interesting chapter because it all but starts with a paragraph in which we are told that the adventure will, eventually, succeed. There is a similar reassuring sentence at one point in PS/SS in the HP saga, which also suggests that Harry's current adventure will have a happy ending. In both cases I assume this early info is to reassure young children and encourage them to dare read on.  :hermioneread: (As an adult, I think it takes away some of the suspence the story might otherwise have built, which is something of a pity. However, as ss19 stated earlier in this DG, it's not a child's book's fault if an adult pick it up and find it less than thrilling.  :harry: )

At the point where Gandalf first mentions that he will leave them soon, we only know that he helped them over the dangerous mountains, so they should probably be very happy he ever travelled with them  at all, and do they have reason to complain? As it turns out later, they have a lot of reasons to complain - seeing as the Mirkwood is described as an even more dangerous place than the mountains!!!  :scared:

I suppose one can argue that they need to be able to survive the wood on their own, or they'll never get past Smaug at the end of their journey. Possibly Gandalf thinks they need the confidence of having got through it on their own or else that it would be impossible to leave them to their own devices after they get out and come close to the lethal dragon at the end of it?  :dumbledore:

I loved  :hearts: the humour and cleverness in how Gandalf introduces the lot of them to Beorn!  :fredgeorge: It would be wonderful to be able to quote here, but his very clever way of gradually raising the amount of the "collection" of dwarves is great fun to read!

By the way, in my book there is a printing error where the dwarves is trickling in, Dorin appears twice!  ::) First together with Thorin, then again with Nori (although when the latter two present themselves, they go Nori and Ori respectively). I suppose this error is nowhere in the original?  :ron:

I also really liked Beorn, who treated them as guests and made sure they were safe, before heading up towards the mountains to check that their story was correct! He seemed like an honest and just man, who is eager to protect these strangers and help them along once he has made sure their tall story is, indeed, the truth.  :gryffindorc:

What feels somewhat surprising is that they get ponies to ride alongside the wood, but once it is time to go through it - which must be done at speed - they have to go by foot. It isn't entirely logical that no one thinks this is odd, or worth trying to find an alternative, I think?

Over all, I think this is a happy, fun, humorous chapter to read, and I really enjoyed it!  :harry: What about others?
 
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May 05, 2013, 05:00:07 AM
Reply #2

Hermione P

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By the way, in my book there is a printing error where the dwarves is trickling in, Dorin appears twice!  ::) First together with Thorin, then again with Nori (although when the latter two present themselves, they go Nori and Ori respectively). I suppose this error is nowhere in the original?  :ron:

No, this error is not in my English edition. Dori went with Thorin first, followed by Nori and Ori. Maybe a typo on the part of the Swedish translator?
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May 11, 2013, 04:30:40 AM
Reply #3

HealerOne

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Lovely Chapter Seven That lucky number! Here we see that the Lord of the Eagles will eventually wear a golden crown ( a symbol of the next Alchemical operation of Conjunction, but before we start that operation Bilbo must complete his Separation from his old self). Notice that Bilbo does not have dreams and longings about his old life in this chapter! As Bilbo continues through the Carrock, he loses his fright and begins to look forward. They meet with Beorn, a shape-shifter. Here is a character that is a truly a 'marriage of opposites' - a kindly man and a fierce bear wrapped into one, In addition he has  animals of all types that peacefully live together. This is our sign that the operation of Conjunction has begun. Notice that Gandalf, Bilbo and the dwarves are introduced slowly as if they are being conjoined into the formula slowly! Once there they seem to be welcomed and 'married' into the home of Beorn. The appearance of the Goblin's head (a horizontal indication of the earthly realm) and the skin of the wolf nailed vertically (indication the up down of the spirit reality) really show us that the story is in the Conjunction operation now. Notice that there is much talking about boundaries and territory in this chapter which also indicates Conjunction is taking place. But once the party has set out again and they prepare to move into the Mirkwood Forest they are making the transition into the next Operation of Alchemy - Fermentation.
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May 15, 2013, 11:42:51 AM
Reply #4

ss19

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I also really liked Beorn, who treated them as guests and made sure they were safe, before heading up towards the mountains to check that their story was correct! He seemed like an honest and just man, who is eager to protect these strangers and help them along once he has made sure their tall story is, indeed, the truth.  :gryffindorc:

What feels somewhat surprising is that they get ponies to ride alongside the wood, but once it is time to go through it - which must be done at speed - they have to go by foot. It isn't entirely logical that no one thinks this is odd, or worth trying to find an alternative, I think?
This makes complete sense from Beorn's perspective though.  Gandalf reminds the dwarves later in the chapter that it's a huge favor that Beorn even let them borrow the horse and ponies for the first part of the journey, the less dangerous part.  His animals are like his children, we're told.  If 14 strangers were to show up at my door and want my children to accompany them on a dangerous journey in order to carry their luggage for them, I would definitely say 'no', even if they try to bribe me or threaten me or whatever else.

« Last Edit: May 15, 2013, 09:23:04 PM by ss19 »
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May 15, 2013, 08:54:10 PM
Reply #5

Evreka

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What feels somewhat surprising is that they get ponies to ride alongside the wood, but once it is time to go through it - which must be done at speed - they have to go by foot. It isn't entirely logical that no one thinks this is odd, or worth trying to find an alternative, I think?
This makes complete sense from Beorn's perspective though.  Gandalf reminds the dwarves later the in chapter that it's a huge favor that Beorn even let them borrow the horse and ponies for the first part of the journey, the less dangerous part.  His animals are like his children, we're told.  If 14 strangers were to show up at my door and want my children to accompany them on a dangerous journey in order to carry their luggage for them, I would definitely say 'no', even if they try to bribe me or threaten me or whatever else.
Ah, yes, of course! Which mother wouldn't?

I realise this wasn't very clear, sorry!  :ashamed: What I meant was that none of the dwarves are daunted by the prospect of borrowing ponies for the ride to the forest, but once inside it, where speed is a must, they have to travel by foot!
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May 15, 2013, 09:35:21 PM
Reply #6

ss19

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Ah, yes, of course! Which mother wouldn't?

I realise this wasn't very clear, sorry!  :ashamed: What I meant was that none of the dwarves are daunted by the prospect of borrowing ponies for the ride to the forest, but once inside it, where speed is a must, they have to travel by foot!
Sorry I misunderstood you before.  I think the dwarves do feel daunted by the prospect of having no ponies once they get into the forest though.  They tried to break their promise to Beorn and keep the ponies when they got to the forest, until Gandalf reminded them that it's a bad idea to turn Beorn into their enemy, and told them that Beorn has been following them and watching them.  I think it's just that the dwarves have no choice at this point but to lose the ponies regardless of how much they want to keep them.
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May 17, 2013, 08:15:40 PM
Reply #7

Evreka

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Ah, yes, of course! Which mother wouldn't?

I realise this wasn't very clear, sorry!  :ashamed: What I meant was that none of the dwarves are daunted by the prospect of borrowing ponies for the ride to the forest, but once inside it, where speed is a must, they have to travel by foot!
Sorry I misunderstood you before.  I think the dwarves do feel daunted by the prospect of having no ponies once they get into the forest though.  They tried to break their promise to Beorn and keep the ponies when they got to the forest, until Gandalf reminded them that it's a bad idea to turn Beorn into their enemy, and told them that Beorn has been following them and watching them.  I think it's just that the dwarves have no choice at this point but to lose the ponies regardless of how much they want to keep them.
Again, true. :D Once they reach the farewell point to the ponies they are less than happy. But when the trip from Beorn's house is planned at Beorn's home, only Bilbo raises any objections, I think? 

But yes, of course they are running out of options. It's just that in almost every other situation we hear a lot about the dwarves being less than happy over things: Loosing the ropes and boat at the river in the forest, being hungry, having to carry Bombur for a good long part of the way, how late they are rescued from the spiders, how they are rescued from the Elven king.... But when they plan the depart from Beorn, only Bilbo complains. I thought that was a bit surprising, but maybe that's just me? Also, I guess I might misremember this (the book is out of reach) and I am tired.
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