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Author Topic: Chapter Ten  (Read 968 times)

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May 05, 2013, 03:09:41 AM

HealerOne

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Chapter Ten
A Warm Welcome

Floating down the river, Bilbo sees The Lonely Mountain in the distance. The raftsmen talk about how much the river and the land have changed in the intervening years since the dwarves left. He learns from them that the only way out of Mirkwood now is the river. Somehow it doesn’t comfort Bilbo that they had gotten out of the forest the only way they could have. Eventually the barrels floating down the river come out at the mouth of Long Lake near the town of Men called Esgaroth. Bilbo learns  that once this town was a bustling center  for trade between the town of Dale, in the mountains, and the wood-elves. Now it is barely able to sustain its small population.

Bilbo helps the dwarves out of the barrels. Thorin, with Fili, Kili, and Bilbo, confronts the town guards and announces that he, the King Under the Mountain, has returned and demands to be taken to their Master. The Master is feasting with the elves who recognize their former prisoners.  Thorin again declares himself the King Under The Mountain and since he is out of the realm of the elves, he no longer is under their laws.  The Master doubts Thorin's? tale but the townspeople believe the legend of the Mountain King's return has happened.  The Master pretends to believe Thorin & co. and welcomes them. The other dwarves enter the town  to a similar reception.. As time passes, the Master of the town eventually is suspicious that perhaps Thorin really is the rightful heir to the dwarf kings. However, upset with the disruption the dwarves have caused, he is eager to see the dwarves depart for the Lonely Mountain, where they expect to reclaim what is rightfully theirs. Bilbo is not particularly happy about leaving, but off they go with boats laden with provisions and ponies sent ahead to meet them at their destination.

~ What convinces the townspeople that Thorin is who he says he is?
~ In this chapter why do you think the dwarves are happy, but Bilbo is not?
~ The Master of the village at first believes Thorin is a fraud, but he changes his mind. Why?
« Last Edit: May 05, 2013, 10:13:36 AM by atschpe »


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May 11, 2013, 10:05:36 AM
Reply #1

Evreka

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As ss19 noted for Chapter 5:
I don't like being "talked to" by the narrator in general when I'm reading a story.  When I'm otherwise absorbed in a story, this interrupts the flow of the story and reminds me that the story's not really happening, that it's only me sitting there reading. 
This is really starting to nag me, too. I want to be "seduced" (for want of a better word) by my books into believing that what I am reading here and now is taking place "for real" in this world that I am currently reading about. This adventure is happening, and I see it unfold. This taking part in the story, has no chance to happen as long as the narrator turns around and look me straight in the eye, nodding to me and telling me that I am really just holding a book and reading a made-up story, every now and then!  >:( I wish I could look back at that narrator and go: "Will you stop, please!"  :fredgeorge:


Quoting myself from Chapter 8 (where they cross the Mirkwood):
Here, in the Mirkwood, they know they are on the right track that will eventually get them out in the quickest and safest route possible; yet they leave it!? Common sense ought to tell them that however far the forest stretches, as long as they stay on the path, they are going forward towards the end, but once they step to the side they are both risking to loose the right way and making the time spent in the woods longer! Seems to me they won't survive long without Gandalf around...  :(
Now, we learn that even if they had kept to the right path all through the forest they would only have hit a dead end at some point!  :o I still stand by my reaction of previously, though, as they had no way of knowing this in advance. Still, it's interesting to realise that Gandalf has learnt that his and Beorn's advice might not have been so sound after all. The fact that he is trying to return to find them is a reassurance of sorts, I guess, even if it makes little sense really. Without Bilbo they had starved to death or been eaten long before Gandalf even heard about the vanished path. It's only in the fairy tale story telling that none of this meant to be a problem.  :D

I find it amazing that everyone in the city they come to are so happy to see the dwarves claiming to be descendants of old kings, that they treat them with such respect! Especially as it is only the oldest of the old who remember anything of this former time. I also wonder what kind of leader the Master of the village is, when he plays along with something he doesn't believe in, which brings on so much honour and help to strangers, just because the townspeople need no proof?  :mcgonagall2: Dwarves must be very unusual in these areas nowadays.

~ The Master of the village at first believes Thorin is a fraud, but he changes his mind. Why?
 
No charlatan would ever think of going near the mountain with the dragon. He'd prefer to stay at the city, safe from danger, especially in a town where he was treated thus good for nothing. The decision to actually challenge the dragon would take a madman or a very determined dwarf, who knew exactly the kind of treasure had been stolen from him, I think?

Further, if Thorin is who he says he is, he just might save them all from the dragon. And if he doesn't he'll just loose his own life and the lives of those travelling with him, not the people of the town. So backing him might mean the Master seizes his chance to get rid of the dragon with as little risk as possible for his people?

What do the rest of you think?
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May 11, 2013, 03:25:23 PM
Reply #2

Hermione P

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As ss19 noted for Chapter 5:
I don't like being "talked to" by the narrator in general when I'm reading a story.  When I'm otherwise absorbed in a story, this interrupts the flow of the story and reminds me that the story's not really happening, that it's only me sitting there reading. 
This is really starting to nag me, too. I want to be "seduced" (for want of a better word) by my books into believing that what I am reading here and now is taking place "for real" in this world that I am currently reading about. This adventure is happening, and I see it unfold. This taking part in the story, has no chance to happen as long as the narrator turns around and look me straight in the eye, nodding to me and telling me that I am really just holding a book and reading a made-up story, every now and then!  >:( I wish I could look back at that narrator and go: "Will you stop, please!"  :fredgeorge:

I didn't like this in Narnia either. :(
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May 27, 2013, 04:45:02 AM
Reply #3

ss19

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~ What convinces the townspeople that Thorin is who he says he is?

I'm guessing it's because they've been singing those songs and longing for the legend to be true all those years, and really do want what Thorin is saying to be true.  Also, they've probably not had other impersonators claiming to be Thror's descendant, since making such a claim would likely mean having to go face Smaug.


~ In this chapter why do you think the dwarves are happy, but Bilbo is not?

Even though Bilbo has come a long way, deep down he's still not quite as much an adventure-and-treasure-seeker as the dwarves are.  As they leave the Lake-town to go on to the last stage of their journey, the dwarves are probably happy thinking they're getting close to reaching their treasures, while Bilbo is unhappy thinking they're getting close to reaching the ultimate danger for the journey.


I also wonder what kind of leader the Master of the village is, when he plays along with something he doesn't believe in, which brings on so much honour and help to strangers, just because the townspeople need no proof?  :mcgonagall2:

I think the Master mostly felt that he had no choice.  The way it was described, it sounded like the people might have turned into a mob if the Master hadn't gone along with their excitement.


~ The Master of the village at first believes Thorin is a fraud, but he changes his mind. Why?
 
No charlatan would ever think of going near the mountain with the dragon. He'd prefer to stay at the city, safe from danger, especially in a town where he was treated thus good for nothing. The decision to actually challenge the dragon would take a madman or a very determined dwarf, who knew exactly the kind of treasure had been stolen from him, I think?

Further, if Thorin is who he says he is, he just might save them all from the dragon. And if he doesn't he'll just loose his own life and the lives of those travelling with him, not the people of the town. So backing him might mean the Master seizes his chance to get rid of the dragon with as little risk as possible for his people?

What do the rest of you think?

Your theory sounds good to me.  :)
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May 27, 2013, 07:57:01 PM
Reply #4

Evreka

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~ In this chapter why do you think the dwarves are happy, but Bilbo is not?
Even though Bilbo has come a long way, deep down he's still not quite as much an adventure-and-treasure-seeker as the dwarves are.  As they leave the Lake-town to go on to the last stage of their journey, the dwarves are probably happy thinking they're getting close to reaching their treasures, while Bilbo is unhappy thinking they're getting close to reaching the ultimate danger for the journey.
I like that explanation a lot. :) It fits beautifully.
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May 28, 2013, 04:23:57 PM
Reply #5

HealerOne

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~ The Master of the village at first believes Thorin is a fraud, but he changes his mind. Why?
 
No charlatan would ever think of going near the mountain with the dragon. He'd prefer to stay at the city, safe from danger, especially in a town where he was treated thus good for nothing. The decision to actually challenge the dragon would take a madman or a very determined dwarf, who knew exactly the kind of treasure had been stolen from him, I think?

Further, if Thorin is who he says he is, he just might save them all from the dragon. And if he doesn't he'll just loose his own life and the lives of those travelling with him, not the people of the town. So backing him might mean the Master seizes his chance to get rid of the dragon with as little risk as possible for his people?

What do the rest of you think?

Your theory sounds good to me.  :)

Well that may have been his thinking, but he wasn't very far sighted then. What if the dragon wins and gets very angry at the dwarves? Mighten he come looking for those that helped him? I believe in the past Smaug terrorized their village. If awakened wouldn't he do that again?

I think he thought the dwarves were just boosting and would trip themselves up by lounging about his town and never go after Smaug. I'm sure he thought they never really would go through with it. 'That's nuts, right?' Of course then he would have been thought the fool for backing the dwarves ... hmmm sort of between a rock and a hard place.
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