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Author Topic: Your Newest Books  (Read 2829 times)

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February 16, 2014, 04:50:33 PM

Evreka

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Your Newest Books
Purchases or other Acquirements


I don't know about the rest of you, but personally I can purchase books or acquire them in some other way (as a loan, inherited, gifted, from the library, ...) at one point in time with every intention of reading them soon... and then something happens. My intention is diverted, by IRL in its pesky form, new books coming out or Internet hogging all free time or for some other reason and the books end up standing on one of my unread shelves for a much longer time than intended, sometimes for years. Have you experienced this too, or am I the only one?

Also, the reasons why I choose to get any particular book can vary quite a lot: I might like the author, have heard of them, be interested by something I've heard of the book, the text on the back of it, its cover or other reason. Many times, the reason I bought it will add up to its content after reading it and other times my thoughts on it before hand and afterwards are worlds apart.

If you are anything like me, discussing what you are currently reading; and discussing your latest purchases or other acquirements are therefore not at all the same thing. And I thought it would be fun to learn what kind of books you are acquiring now, and what it was that made you pick them up and choose those specific books?

Please share the story behind your newest books!
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February 17, 2014, 10:01:34 PM
Reply #1

Dreamteam

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Well I'm trying hard not to buy new books but there are far too many times when it just has to happen.  My latest books have been bought because I've read something by an author, often something I've had for a while (perhaps years) and I've enjoyed it so much that I've then wanted other works by the same author.  Having bought them it's anyone's guess how long it will then take me to get around to reading them, I just know that, at some point, I want to.


The book I'm currently reading is The Ascent of Man by Jacob Bronowski which I bought way back in 1980 and I've just never got around to reading before, I just knew when I bought it that I wanted to read it.  Another reason for buying a book is because I've talked to someone who's read it and I've liked the sound of it so have bought it, again with the intention that one day I'll get around to reading it.  The main problem is that I tend to see books I want faster than I can read them and when I was working full time they piled up somewhat.   

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February 18, 2014, 07:22:54 PM
Reply #2

Evreka

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Sometime in the first week of January, I checked out a post Christmas sale in a book store, but while there my brain went absolutely blank on the titles/authors of the books that I had on a list and was intending to buy soon, so instead I looked at books in a more open minded state. On the English Memoir shelf I found a book called Treasures from the Attic by Mirjam Pressler, according to the text at the back: After an old woman dies, and her relatives are looking through her belongings, they find a treasure of sorts in the Attic. Long letters, photographs and the like sent between members of the Frank family, Anne's family.

I can't say how old I was when I read Anne Frank's Diary, probably sometime in my teens. But since then, I have read many other books about that family, including Miep Gies' Anne Frank Remembered and when I visited Amsterdam some years ago, I made sure to visit die Achter Haus (?) where the family hid for about 2 years.

So as soon as I spotted that book, I really wanted it.


At the time, I had very recently finished my first book by Alice Munroe, and felt curious about more of her works, so I got two more by her: Open Secrets which I have since read, and Runaway which I am currently reading.

The fourth book I picked up was a complete accident. It just happened to be on display right next to the corner where I was resting my arm from the books I was already carrying. A Gift of Hope by Danielle Steel. I picked it up because it was an author that I've read quite a few books of, and realising it was about homelessness it felt like one of those books that perhaps you ought to read. Especially as I only had finished the first Bob book just days before.


The main problem is that I tend to see books I want faster than I can read them and when I was working full time they piled up somewhat.   
I know what you mean here, in my case it also doesn't help that I tend to want to re-read some of my favourites quite a few times. HP obviously, but it applies to more than HP.
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February 22, 2014, 05:22:04 AM
Reply #3

ss19

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I'm the opposite when it comes to buying books.  I very, very rarely buy books, because I don't want them to take up shelf space unless they are books that I or someone else in the family will want to read multiple times.  And in order to know that we'll want to re-read a book repeatedly, we'll have already read it once to know how much we love the book.  So I don't have a to-read pile like Evreka and Dreamteam do.

However, after I acquired a Kindle, I've loved how easy it is for me to pick up the Kindle on my way out without planning ahead, and to be able to read if I find myself stuck somewhere waiting.  And I quickly found out that I can get a lot of books free on the Kindle, particularly classics (I assume because the copyright has expired for these books?), so I've put a bunch of those on the Kindle so that I can always have something to read if I'm out and about and end up with some unexpected time for reading.  Some of the ebooks I've gotten free and have been able to read recently include: Oliver Twist, Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, and David Copperfield which I'm reading now.  I did also purchase The Cuckoo's Calling for the Kindle (that one wasn't free, obviously).
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February 22, 2014, 03:16:43 PM
Reply #4

HealerOne

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I love books more than I aught too! So much so that my 7 bookcases were full to the top and I was running out of room as to where to put them! My kindle has been a godsend! Now I rarely buy a real book! I love how quick it is to download books into my Kindle and take it anywhere to read. And I can reread any of them at a touch! The prices of the Kindle books are less than for the hard copies and as ss19 has said, many great books you can get for free. I always keep an eye out for sales too when you can get really good best sellers for a low price.

The newest book I've bought/downloaded was Alexander McCall Smith's Forever Girl. I enjoy his books so much and this is his newest one.
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February 26, 2014, 09:30:21 PM
Reply #5

Evreka

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Today I bought two books, the first being Jag är Malala which is the Swedish translation for I Am Malala as a gift to my mother, as I think she'll enjoy the book and yet I can't lend my own English copy to her. (She doesn't like to read in English.)


The other was En oväntad vänskap (In English approx An Unexpected Friendship)by Abdel Sellou. It is a true story, and there's a film (that I haven't seen) that came before this book. I've read a bit about it, and became curious. From what I know of the book: In 1997, Abdel Sellou was an unemployed young man, who didn't really care about anything. He went to an interview for a job as personal assistent, not because he was interested, but to get a signature that he'd been there to show the authorities, so he'd continue to get money as an unemployed. To his enormous surprise, he got the job instead! Apparently these two, the employer and the new assistent, changed each others life around for something better.... It seems like an intriguing tale.  :luna:

However, the most surprising thing about it is this: On my ride through the Underground/Tube on my way home today, I picked it up and read the text on the back of it and the foreword. While doing so, two different strangers (without knowing of each other), spontaneously congratulated me for having bought it as it was "a truly wonderful story"!!! :surprised: Both owned the film, and was obviously thrilled by it. It isn't exactly common that strangers approach each other on the Underground, and strike up conversations. (It happens occasionally for things like what time it is or where the line goes.... that kind of things.) But for two people to do it within 15 minutes or so on the same trip and for the reason of somebody's book.... this story must really be special!!!  :hermioneread:

I'll finish my current book, and then this one might well be next in line....
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March 23, 2014, 02:38:10 PM
Reply #6

Evreka

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On Friday, on my way home from work, I took a turn into a book shop near work and came home with two new titles:

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
As I was searching the book shelves for something else; this (displaced) copy of the book, suddenly lay there in a corner. I remember the book being discussed at Leaky Lounge (though I took no part in the discussions), and many of you have recommended it. There are things about this book, that I think seem quite odd, and not necessarily appealing, in the descriptions I've heard. But still, it's about fictional events during WWII, so I decided to give it a go.

Not sure when I'll get around to read it, but it's one step closer compared to not having it...


And then Came Paulette by Barbara Constantine
I picked it up due to the (Swedish) cover that spoke of wonderful summer greens, with a blurry mid part showing people sitting out on the grass, a peaceful and great image this early in the spring. Flipping it over and reading on the back of it, it felt related to another originally French book Hunting and Gathering by Anna Gavalda. The latter, was a truly charming (fictional) story, a feel-good book about loneliness countered by generosity and warmth, of how a group of outcast strangers of various kinds found new hope in life - even friends - by being warm and inviting towards each other. I read the book in 2008, and the warmth have stayed with me ever since. One of those books that you just don't forget...

This new book, in its promising green cover, is also about lonely people who find each other through the acts of a generous man, offering a helping hand when they need it the most. It felt like it just could be the same type of book as Gavalda's, so I decided to give it a go.   :hermioneread:
« Last Edit: March 23, 2014, 03:11:14 PM by Evreka »
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April 02, 2014, 09:44:36 PM
Reply #7

Dreamteam

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The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
As I was searching the book shelves for something else; this (displaced) copy of the book, suddenly lay there in a corner. I remember the book being discussed at Leaky Lounge (though I took no part in the discussions), and many of you have recommended it. There are things about this book, that I think seem quite odd, and not necessarily appealing, in the descriptions I've heard. But still, it's about fictional events during WWII, so I decided to give it a go.

Not sure when I'll get around to read it, but it's one step closer compared to not having it...
I've now read The Book Thief three times and it has become one of my all-time favourites (along with such books as Pride and Prejudice, Tess of the D'Urbervilles and the Harry Potter series it's a books that I know I'll read again and again).  I also saw the movie recently and was delighted to find that it's a good representation of the books which makes a nice change.  There are no spoilers here but it's a beautiful story of ordinary people in a not-so-ordinary situation and the story is narrated by Death who has very human emotions and thoughts.  I also felt that it gave a more rounded view of life in WWII Germany than I'd come across before. 

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April 16, 2014, 05:39:09 AM
Reply #8

Evreka

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I haven't read this book yet, so I understand that replying to this might not be so easy, as I would prefer no spoilers. However...

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
As I was searching the book shelves for something else; this (displaced) copy of the book, suddenly lay there in a corner. I remember the book being discussed at Leaky Lounge (though I took no part in the discussions), and many of you have recommended it. There are things about this book, that I think seem quite odd, and not necessarily appealing, in the descriptions I've heard. But still, it's about fictional events during WWII, so I decided to give it a go.
I've now read The Book Thief three times and it has become one of my all-time favourites ...  There are no spoilers here but it's a beautiful story of ordinary people in a not-so-ordinary situation and the story is narrated by Death who has very human emotions and thoughts.  I also felt that it gave a more rounded view of life in WWII Germany than I'd come across before.
What makes me so at the fence about how much I like to read this book or not, is precisely because I know that it is narrated by Death!  :o It is such an odd choice... and it sounds... extremely weird.

I've come across one book like that before:
Mort by Terry Pratchett - but that's OK. I mean his books are completely out there and wildly unreal and completely "all over the place" kind of books. In a way his books are jokes in themselves, he mocks around with a lot.  :jester:

But this... being a book about WWII... I don't know how "tasteful", for want of a better word, it is going to be. It just seems like a very, very strange choice by Zusack. Still, the fact that you and others have recommended it, does make me curious...
« Last Edit: April 16, 2014, 05:42:47 AM by Evreka »
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April 28, 2014, 03:59:11 PM
Reply #9

Dreamteam

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I haven't read this book yet, so I understand that replying to this might not be so easy, as I would prefer no spoilers. However...

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
As I was searching the book shelves for something else; this (displaced) copy of the book, suddenly lay there in a corner. I remember the book being discussed at Leaky Lounge (though I took no part in the discussions), and many of you have recommended it. There are things about this book, that I think seem quite odd, and not necessarily appealing, in the descriptions I've heard. But still, it's about fictional events during WWII, so I decided to give it a go.
I've now read The Book Thief three times and it has become one of my all-time favourites ...  There are no spoilers here but it's a beautiful story of ordinary people in a not-so-ordinary situation and the story is narrated by Death who has very human emotions and thoughts.  I also felt that it gave a more rounded view of life in WWII Germany than I'd come across before.
What makes me so at the fence about how much I like to read this book or not, is precisely because I know that it is narrated by Death!  :o It is such an odd choice... and it sounds... extremely weird.

I've come across one book like that before:
Mort by Terry Pratchett - but that's OK. I mean his books are completely out there and wildly unreal and completely "all over the place" kind of books. In a way his books are jokes in themselves, he mocks around with a lot.  :jester:

But this... being a book about WWII... I don't know how "tasteful", for want of a better word, it is going to be. It just seems like a very, very strange choice by Zusack. Still, the fact that you and others have recommended it, does make me curious...
Strangely, it didn't feel "weird" when reading it and I didn't feel it was distasteful.  If anything I found Death's thoughts and feelings quite refreshing and understandable.  Also, the story isn't really about death, or even Death, it's about a young girl's view of events and how she copes and it's about love and caring.  Might have to go and read it again soon :)

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May 07, 2014, 03:57:17 PM
Reply #10

SnapesSister

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I haven't read this book yet, so I understand that replying to this might not be so easy, as I would prefer no spoilers. However...

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
As I was searching the book shelves for something else; this (displaced) copy of the book, suddenly lay there in a corner. I remember the book being discussed at Leaky Lounge (though I took no part in the discussions), and many of you have recommended it. There are things about this book, that I think seem quite odd, and not necessarily appealing, in the descriptions I've heard. But still, it's about fictional events during WWII, so I decided to give it a go.
I've now read The Book Thief three times and it has become one of my all-time favourites ...  There are no spoilers here but it's a beautiful story of ordinary people in a not-so-ordinary situation and the story is narrated by Death who has very human emotions and thoughts.  I also felt that it gave a more rounded view of life in WWII Germany than I'd come across before.
What makes me so at the fence about how much I like to read this book or not, is precisely because I know that it is narrated by Death!  :o It is such an odd choice... and it sounds... extremely weird.

I've come across one book like that before:
Mort by Terry Pratchett - but that's OK. I mean his books are completely out there and wildly unreal and completely "all over the place" kind of books. In a way his books are jokes in themselves, he mocks around with a lot.  :jester:

But this... being a book about WWII... I don't know how "tasteful", for want of a better word, it is going to be. It just seems like a very, very strange choice by Zusack. Still, the fact that you and others have recommended it, does make me curious...
Strangely, it didn't feel "weird" when reading it and I didn't feel it was distasteful.  If anything I found Death's thoughts and feelings quite refreshing and understandable.  Also, the story isn't really about death, or even Death, it's about a young girl's view of events and how she copes and it's about love and caring.  Might have to go and read it again soon :)

Funnily enough, The Book Thief is next on my 'to-read' list. I bought it a couple of years ago, but only got a chapter in before I started reading something else as well, so I never got any further. Once I finish my current book I shall remedy that, especially as one of my co-workers keeps telling me that I absolutely must read it, lol.

I have a very bad habit of buying or downloading books when I know I already have a pile as long as both arms put together waiting to be read. It doesn't help that my place of work also sells books - in fact, the department I work on sells them - so I can often be found browsing the shelves during quiet moments, looking for something that catches my eye.

Recently I bought The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson, which I'm actually reading at the moment. The cover caught my eye and the blurb on the back intrigued me, so of course I had to buy it. The week before that I got The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton. Again, the synopsis reeled me in and it sounded like the sort of book I'd enjoy.
I also recently bought Divergent and Insurgent by Veronica Roth. So many people have been raving about the books, so I decided to see what the fuss was about and got the first and second as part of a Buy One, Get One Free deal in a bookshop. I do love bargains.  ;D
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May 07, 2014, 08:48:39 PM
Reply #11

Evreka

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Yesterday I felt compelled to sneak into a book shop close to my work on my way home. On one of the shelves I found The First Phone Call from Heaven by Mitch Albom, and remembering Dreamteam's recommendations (in What Are You Reading?), I decided to try it out.

Also, after the book ends, there is the first chapter of another of Mitch Albom's books: The Five People You Meet in Heaven. It's quite an unusual first chapter of a book, but made me a little interested in the book. Have anyone here read it?
I've read a few of Mitch Albom's books, including The Five People You Meet in Heaven, and I really like them.  This book is about, as the title says, the five people you meet in heaven - not necessarily the five people you would expect to meet, such as family and friends.  They are the five people who have had an influence on your life, even if you didn't know it at the time, and makes a really interesting read. Tuesdays with Morrie is still on my To Read Pile so I haven't read that one yet.  I do find that his books give an interesting perspective and if you enjoy this one I can recommend For One More Day and The Time Keeper and I've just noticed one I haven't come across before, The First Phone Call from Heaven, which I've now downloaded to my Kindle (those piles will never go down!).

I've just read a few pages, and it sure starts in a really unbelievable way. So far I like that he is keeping it open whether this is "real" or a hoax....   :-\
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August 29, 2014, 08:48:49 PM
Reply #12

ss19

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Last month I bought The Silkworm ebook to read while I was traveling.  I had originally requested the hardcover book from my library many months before it was published and was in line to get the book as soon as it arrived at the library, but I ended up going away and had to cancel my request and let the next person have the library book instead.  I wanted to read the book (or start reading it) before I got home so I could (1) take advantage of the reading time I had during the long flights, and (2) try to participate in the book discussion here when I got back.  So I decided to buy the eBook version for my Kindle rather than waiting to get the library book when I got home.

At the end of July, I also bought the set of Harry Potter ebooks from the Pottermore shop on the last day they had the 25% off deal.  I debated all month long whether to buy these since I already own the hardcover set for the series, but in the end decided to get them because I wanted the books in a searchable format, in case the deal doesn't come back again soon.  I didn't get around to actually downloading the books I bought nearly a month ago until today.  When I tried the search function on the books today, it didn't work, saying these titles weren't indexed.  :annoyed:  I thought I was certain these particular ebooks were searchable (I know some ebooks are not) ...   :headbang: If anyone else reading this has the American version and/or knows anything about this, please do let me know.


Edited to add:
I tried the search again and it worked!  I'm not sure why it didn't earlier, unless it doesn't normally work right after an ebook is downloaded?  Maybe the index wasn't fully downloaded with the text yet when I tried?  The message I got when the search didn't work was something like, "This title is not yet indexed."   Anyway, I'm happy it works now.  :thumbup:

« Last Edit: August 30, 2014, 04:29:24 AM by ss19 »
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August 30, 2014, 02:09:19 PM
Reply #13

siena

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Since you requested/ordered The Silkworm, ss19, I gather you did read the first volume of the Strike novels  ??? . I can't recall reading your review anywhere ( if you did post, please do point me) so I would really like to know what you think.

It's just that I was SO disappointed by it ... in fact to such an extent, that I didn't even feel like requesting The Silkworm from my library ... and requests only cost 40p...

I am just asking because you once said (somewhere) that you are not the kind of person to blindly invest into books you don't know for sure you will appreciate  :what:

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August 30, 2014, 04:25:04 PM
Reply #14

Evreka

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Edited to add:
I tried the search again and it worked!  I'm not sure why it didn't earlier, unless it doesn't normally work right after an ebook is downloaded?  Maybe the index wasn't fully downloaded with the text yet when I tried?  The message I got when the search didn't work was something like, "This title is not yet indexed."   Anyway, I'm happy it works now.  :thumbup:
Oh, that's awsome news!  :thumbup: I might get them too, since that would help so much when I'm trying to locate things I know has happened but can't easily place in time. I remember trying to scan OOP once, looking for a specific quote of Harry's which I knew was in it somewhere but that he could have said at any point during the school year... I had to give up on it... :(


Since you requested/ordered The Silkworm, ss19, I gather you did read the first volume of the Strike novels  ??? . I can't recall reading your review anywhere ( if you did post, please do point me) so I would really like to know what you think.
You could try this post of ss19's, although it is just about one aspect of the book. There is an old DG for CC in which ss19 has posted some more things, that you could try searching in.   
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September 01, 2014, 06:09:47 AM
Reply #15

ss19

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Since you requested/ordered The Silkworm, ss19, I gather you did read the first volume of the Strike novels  ??? . I can't recall reading your review anywhere ( if you did post, please do point me) so I would really like to know what you think.

Yes, I did read the first Strike novel also. :)  I don't think I posted a general review of the book yet (but I will do so for you in the next paragraph).  As Evreka mentioned, I did post in some of the topic discussions in the discussion group for The Cuckoo's Calling here.  There were also (I think) two threads from that discussion group that continue for the second Strike book and therefore have been moved to the forum for The Silkworm here that also contain some of my comments about the first book.  You should stay out of that second forum though, obviously, if you haven't read The Silkworm yet.

I did like The Cuckoo's Calling, but didn't love it like I love the Potter books.  Though for me it was already a big deal that I finished the book and liked it, because I don't normally read murder mysteries.  The characters, again, were a big part of the reason why I liked the book, as they were in the Potter books (I don't normally read fantasy either).  The characters in the Strike novel were very real and convincing, and I cared enough about them to want to know what's going to happen to them next, so that kept me going.  There wasn't a Snape character in the novel for me to obsess over though, so I'm not obsessed with the Strike novels at all and don't feel the need to keep re-reading those books.  :snape:


It's just that I was SO disappointed by it ... in fact to such an extent, that I didn't even feel like requesting The Silkworm from my library ... and requests only cost 40p...

Maybe it has to do with our different expectations for the book?  Maybe you had very high expectations for the book based on other people's positive reviews, so it ended up being a disappointment?  I, on the other hand, expected not to like it and thought I might not even finish it if I didn't like the beginning.


I am just asking because you once said (somewhere) that you are not the kind of person to blindly invest into books you don't know for sure you will appreciate  :what:

Yes, I'm impressed that you remember I've said this.  I very rarely buy books.  The reason I bought The Cuckoo's Calling was because I wanted to try one of Jo's adult books, and from what I was hearing about that book, it sounded like there was a better chance of me liking it than The Casual Vacancy (which I still haven't read yet).

And another reason I bought the book was that there was a good deal on the eBook for only $6.  I hadn't requested that book from my library in advance so by the time I wanted it, there were hundreds of people in line and it would have taken too long.  Not to mention that when others are waiting for a book, I won't be allowed to renew it so I didn't think I could finish reading it before I had to return it, and it would have cost too much time and gas (petrol) to drive to and from the library to pick up and return the book multiple times.  So I thought it was cheaper to just buy the eBook for $6 and I'd be able to have it immediately and take as long as I need to finish the book.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2014, 06:13:41 AM by ss19 »
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September 09, 2014, 11:05:19 PM
Reply #16

Dreamteam

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Despite my attempts to reduce my To Read piles I've recently bought another two hardbacked books (what can I say? I was in a book store with vouchers to spend in a variety of shops, including that one, and I weakened  :-[  ).  So, I've now added The Miniaturist, a first novel by Jessie Burton, which sounds magical and intriguing and The Marriage Game by Alison Weir, which is a fictional book about Elizabeth I's relationships and how she dealt with the pressure on her to marry and produce an heir.   


On top of that I've also downloaded to my Kindle the books so far in the new series of Doctor Who stories written by well known novelists in which they were asked to choose a Doctor and write a story for him.  I'd already got those written by children's authors to celebrate the 50th Anniversary and this new set of short stories appealed also, although, with more than one story for some Doctors it may be that it's not limited to the number of Doctors so far. 


I really must set aside a specific time each day for reading, if only other things didn't keep getting in the way. 

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November 03, 2014, 09:03:49 PM
Reply #17

Dreamteam

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Oh dear, the red mist of book buying came over me again recently and I succumbed much too readily.  I was looking through my books deciding whether or not I could let each one go after a re-read and came across Raffles of the Albany (tales of a gentleman thief) by Barry Perowne who had taken up the stories after the original author, E W Hornung.  I just happened to see the book on a website (can't even remember which one now) and saw some other books about Raffles and before I knew what had happened (honest!) I had bought four more books by Perowne or Hornung, all second hand books, one having come from the Lake Geneva Public Library, so it's had quite a journey to Yorkshire. 


Around the same time I was also lured into the website for a company which sells books very cheaply (The Book People) and ordered The King's Curse by Philippa Gregory, it's the sixth book in the Cousins' War series.  I also ordered a set of the first ten books about Hamish Macbeth, a policeman in the Scottish Highlands, by M C Beaton, I loved the tv series some years ago and I've enjoyed her Agatha Raisin whodunnits - my resolve not to buy any more books for a while went out of the window  :ashamed:  I've already delved in and read Death of a Gossip today. 

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November 03, 2014, 11:21:06 PM
Reply #18

HealerOne

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    • Chasing the Tale
Oh wow! I thought I was the only one around who loved MC Beaton's quirky detective, Agatha Raisin and the bachelor policeman, Hamish MacBeth! I think I have read every one of those books. I just love Beaton's off beat characters.  I have gotten a friend of mine into reading those stories too - because she borrows them from me!

I have found a website that lured me in too, but for e-books. It's called Book Bub and I have gotten so many books, it's ridiculous. They are either very reduced in price or they are free. I swear I have no idea when I will have time to read all the ones I have gotten, but I can't help myself! I swear I am a Book addict! Frankly I don't want a 12-step program to cure myself of accumulating books, because now that I have a Kindle - I just keeping adding them into the Cloud! Sure beats having to put an addition onto my house for a library!
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November 06, 2014, 07:16:54 PM
Reply #19

Evreka

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My newest books are the Kindle version of seven favourites of mine: the HP books. :)

I bought them for primarily two reasons: This way I can take all of them with me when I travel.  :hermioneread: And I like the thought of being able to search for an illusive sentence that I know is "somewhere" in OOP for example and I would like to quote for one reason or another.

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