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Author Topic: Chapter Eleven: The Firebolt  (Read 947 times)

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March 23, 2014, 08:57:34 PM

JaneMarple9

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(Chap Summary by twiddlethosedials )

Fan Art by gerre


Harry barely sleeps at all after learning the truth about Black, and even Malfoy knew before he did. He, Ron and Hermione head to see Hagrid on the first day of the holidays. Suddenly, Harry’s problems aren’t quite as important - Buckbeak is in Sirius trouble! We learn what the Dementors do to Hagrid as we hear him talk about Azkaban. Soon, it’s Christmas, and just as mysteriously as the Cloak arrived in Harry’s first year, there’s a Firebolt with his name on it, given anonymously. Trelawney joins the Christmas lunch, making a table for 13, but it’s unclear whether Harry or Ron is doomed by this. McGonagall confiscates the Firebolt to make sure it’s not cursed.

A few questions to get you started:
1) What do Hagrid’s worst memories reveal about his character? How do they measure up to Harry’s?

2) Hermione squealing about the broom to McGonagall - the right thing to do, or a horrible miscarriage of justice?

3) Trelawney doesn’t make up the suspicion about what happens when 13 dine together - it comes from the Last Supper. Are we meant to see any parallels with Judas’s betrayal of Jesus and this story, or is it just a clever plot device to make us dislike Trelawney even more?



"There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with a really big library"
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March 24, 2014, 05:25:37 PM
Reply #1

siena

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Both Harry and Hagrid suffered losses very young in life. Harry doesn't consciously remember losing his parents because he was so young,  but the loss still has an impact on him subconsciously. Hagrid was a lot older when his Dad died so the loss would have had a massive impact, especially as they seemed to have enjoyed a loving relationship from what Hagrid tells us about his father. Both Harry and Hagrid found a new home at Hogwarts, so it must have been devastating for Hagrid to get expelled. Luckily Dumbledore (who probably didn't believe that Hagrid was the culprit) let him stay.

This has been discussed so often but anyway: I think Hermione did the right thing. It really is fishy to receive a brand new broomstick that costs a fortune out of the blue ! Harry and Ron are usually so perceptive, but here all good sense seems to have gone out of the window.

I don't know - do we really dislike Trelawney? I would say we pity her and her way to delude herself, but otherwise I find it quite amusing to read about her.  I remember that a few people pointed out other predictions made by her that are based on some kind of background story, whether biblical or other. I think Rowling wanted to test her readers a bit whether they would find them.

Snape and the cracker never fail to amuse me in this chapter ... :lol:
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March 25, 2014, 10:21:36 PM
Reply #2

roonwit

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This has been discussed so often but anyway: I think Hermione did the right thing. It really is fishy to receive a brand new broomstick that costs a fortune out of the blue ! Harry and Ron are usually so perceptive, but here all good sense seems to have gone out of the window.
Ron seems to be intuitive, so maybe he senses the truth that it is safe, though I agree neither he nor Harry are making a reasoned decision, because Hermione is right that an anonymous top-quality broomstick is very suspicious.
I don't know - do we really dislike Trelawney? I would say we pity her and her way to delude herself, but otherwise I find it quite amusing to read about her.  I remember that a few people pointed out other predictions made by her that are based on some kind of background story, whether biblical or other. I think Rowling wanted to test her readers a bit whether they would find them.
Yes, I think we pity her. I think she does almost see but her interpretation is usually distorted by over dramatization (eg. Lavender getting bad news on 16th October rather than the thing she has been dreading).
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April 03, 2014, 05:38:49 PM
Reply #3

HealerOne

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I know that most of you think Trelawney is a fake and needs to be pitied because of that, but I am of the persuasion that Trelawney has insight into the future but she has no faith in her abilities and that is what is to pitied. Trelawney also has a great deal of difficulty interpreting what she envisions which makes her predictions so shaky.  I don't remember who, but back in the Leaky discussion, I recall someone pointing out that the likelihood was that Ron had the Rat, Pettigrew, in his pocket during the feast. That would have made thirteen at the table before Trelawney came, so that when DD arises from the table to greet Trelawney - he is the first to rise ... and as we know now, the first of those at the table to die.

I would wonder that DD, realizing the Dark Lord was getting stronger, was reaching out to Trelawney more than in the past and that is why she comes to the feast that Christmas Day.

Since Hermione couldn't seem to persuade Harry to be serious about the broom, she resorts to tattling to McGonagall. I am sure that in retrospect she wishes she hadn't had to do that, but in the long run her instincts served her well.
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April 03, 2014, 06:19:59 PM
Reply #4

siena

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I know that most of you think Trelawney is a fake and needs to be pitied because of that, but I am of the persuasion that Trelawney has insight into the future but she has no faith in her abilities and that is what is to pitied.

What about her prediction in OoTP after Harry gave the interview in the Qibbler, that Harry is not going to die a painful death after all, but would become Minister of Magic and have twelve children ? And what about her predictions before, saying that Harry would suffer  a painful death? He never becomes Minister as far as we know, and for all we know he only ever has three children. And he never suffered a painful death - he never really died, and even when he reached the dreamlike state in DH after Voldemort tried to kill him, he didn't suffer pain.


Since Hermione couldn't seem to persuade Harry to be serious about the broom, she resorts to tattling to McGonagall. I am sure that in retrospect she wishes she hadn't had to do that, but in the long run her instincts served her well.


I don't think she regretted telling McGonagall. She felt awkward about it in front of Harry and Ron, but that's about it. Maybe she could have tried a little harder reasoning with the two though.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2014, 06:24:10 PM by siena »
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June 01, 2014, 04:44:36 PM
Reply #5

Evreka

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1) What do Hagrid’s worst memories reveal about his character? How do they measure up to Harry’s?

He has some very powerful and dark memories in his past too, and of course those are what the Dementors leave him with as well.

Both Harry and Hagrid suffered losses very young in life. Harry doesn't consciously remember losing his parents because he was so young,  but the loss still has an impact on him subconsciously. Hagrid was a lot older when his Dad died so the loss would have had a massive impact, especially as they seemed to have enjoyed a loving relationship from what Hagrid tells us about his father. Both Harry and Hagrid found a new home at Hogwarts, so it must have been devastating for Hagrid to get expelled.
Not that we know about it yet, but the loss of his father must have hit him twice as strong as his mother walked out of him when he was even younger.  :(



2) Hermione squealing about the broom to McGonagall - the right thing to do, or a horrible miscarriage of justice?
Well... I guess it depends from which angle we see it, but I understand her and support her choice. Maybe, she could have voiced her concerns to Harry and Ron in detail before going to McGonagall about it, trying to make them acknowledge the danger? Maybe she was afraid that the boys would see it as even more base treachery if she did, I don't know.

But like siena said:
I think Hermione did the right thing. It really is fishy to receive a brand new broomstick that costs a fortune out of the blue !
Why, indeed, would anyome send such a valuable present anonymously? Knowing that Black is at large, that he is after Harry and that this could be a way to get him without having to enter Hogwarts grounds, I definitely understand her worry, after all her number one priority is to keep Harry safe.  :hug:

It's interesting that we get more fishy info on the most mysterious Lupin, in such an unobtrusive way that we tend to miss it as it is sprangled in when the boys discuss who sent the broomstick, and Ron suggests Lupin. And I love the detail of Jo's plot as it is thanks to a detention of Ron's that he is aware Lupin was not at the hospital wing at the Quidditch match.


3) Trelawney doesn’t make up the suspicion about what happens when 13 dine together - it comes from the Last Supper. Are we meant to see any parallels with Judas’s betrayal of Jesus and this story, or is it just a clever plot device to make us dislike Trelawney even more?
I don't think it's either, I think it is just there as comical relief. 13 is known as an unlucky number, and I just love how she proposes to give the impression she saw this by her Inner Eye, yet somehow missed the fact that they were 12 at the table without her...  :P

I don't know - ...Trelawney? I would say we pity her and her way to delude herself, but otherwise I find it quite amusing to read about her. 
Yes, I think we pity her. I think she does almost see but her interpretation is usually distorted by over dramatization (eg. Lavender getting bad news on 16th October rather than the thing she has been dreading).
I see her as an almost complete fraud, who is used primarily for a laugh. Saving her real Predictions, I don't think she Sees anything at all, the rest are just pretence and a spooky manner. She bases her "predictions" on what she finds likely to happen and some susceptible individuals will play into her hands and behave in ways that will make her words seem real.

Lavender would have treated any piece of bad news that day as proof of the "prediction" earlier: She obviously dreaded failing that test, ruining that dress, breaking that thing or her baby rabbit dieing.... Yeah, right.  :thumbdown:

What about her prediction in OoTP after Harry gave the interview in the Qibbler, that Harry is not going to die a painful death after all, but would become Minister of Magic and have twelve children ? And what about her predictions before, saying that Harry would suffer  a painful death? He never becomes Minister as far as we know, and for all we know he only ever has three children. And he never suffered a painful death - he never really died, and even when he reached the dreamlike state in DH after Voldemort tried to kill him, he didn't suffer pain.
These are just a few of her miss hits as far as her predictions goes. She is certain Buckbeak will die, that Harry is born in mid-winter, her repeated claims that Harry will die young, she didn't see Draco's attack on her in the Hiding Room in HBP ... I could go on much longer.

She says it herself, later in this book, that she makes things up (although she likely isn't aware of what she is saying...  :P )



Snape and the cracker never fail to amuse me in this chapter ... :lol:
I love that too - but I'm not surprised he didn't!  :lol:


One of my favourite lines in this chapter is Ron's here:
Quote from:  POA, p 167 BPE
"I don't think anyone should ride that broom just yet!" said Hermione shrilly.
Harry and Ron looked at her.
"What d'you think Harry's going to do with it -- sweep the floor?" said Ron.

 :lol:  I just LOVE this, how this use for a broom is being absolutely ludicrous to wizards!  :fredgeorge:


And the other is Minerva's reply to Sibyll:
Quote from: POA, p 170 BPE
"But one does not parade the fact that one is All-Knowing. I frequently act as though I am not possessed of the Inner Eye, so as not to make others nervous. [Trelawney]
"That explains a great deal," said Professor McGonagall tartly.
:mcgonagall2:   :hearts:  ROFL!
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