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Author Topic: Chapter Nineteen: The Servant of Lord Voldemort  (Read 921 times)

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April 21, 2014, 06:48:04 AM

JaneMarple9

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Chapter Nineteen: The Servant of Lord Voldemort
(Chap Summary by twiddlethosedials )



Fan Art by Thanfiction


Snape’s not interested in hearing any explanations. He binds Lupin, but before he can bind, curse or kill Black, he’s hit with a triple spell from the Trio - who wants to bet Snape wishes he’d never showed Harry “Expelliarmus?” The spell knocks Snape out and frees Lupin and Black to force Scabbers to show his true colors, transforming back into Peter Pettigrew. After hearing his pathetic reasoning for betraying Harry’s parents, Harry just stops Lupin and Black from killing Pettigrew - instead deciding Azkaban is just the place for such a rat.

A few questions to get you started:
1) There are those who’d call Snape a hero, those who’d call him an anti-hero, and others who say he’s amoral. How does Snape’s behavior in this chapter reflect each of those arguments?

2) What prompted each member of the Trio to disarm Snape?

3) Why did Pettigrew betray his friends? Were James, Remus or Sirius ever really his friends? Was he ever really theirs?



"There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with a really big library"
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April 21, 2014, 03:40:40 PM
Reply #1

roonwit

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1) There are those who’d call Snape a hero, those who’d call him an anti-hero, and others who say he’s amoral. How does Snape’s behavior in this chapter reflect each of those arguments?
I think he is firmly in villain mode here, pursuing the shortest route to revenge, under a thin disguise of justice. If he was really interested in justice he would have listened to what Sirius and Lupin had to say, and if he was really interested in doing what was right he would have brought some wolfsbane potion with him so Lupin wouldn't be dangerous.
2) What prompted each member of the Trio to disarm Snape?
They all see that Snape is behaving in an almost demented manner, and should be stopped.
3) Why did Pettigrew betray his friends? Were James, Remus or Sirius ever really his friends? Was he ever really theirs?
I think they were friends, but the friendship was stretched at times by the way James and Sirius treated Peter, and the role Peter felt he was expected to perform. However, the friendship weakened when they left school and Peter felt less of the benefits of being with the school top dogs James and Sirius.
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April 23, 2014, 11:20:35 AM
Reply #2

siena

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I agree that it is very difficult not to be appalled by Snape's behaviour here. I do understand his desire to get revenge, but it is completely taking over here, driving all sense from his mind. However irate and agitated he obviously was, he should have listened to Lupin at least, if he wasn't willing to hear Sirius out. Sirius is earnestly requesting to be listened to. Even a supposed criminal has the right to speak for himself.

However, I cannot quite agree on the issue of the Potion. It is Lupin's responsibility to take it at the prescribed times and to make sure not to miss a dose. Now Lupin got carried away when he saw the events unfolding on the map. Snape was actually on his way to Lupin with the potion to remind him to take it. Then he, Snape, got carried away as well when he took a look at the map and forgot about the potion. Now, if we forgive Lupin for getting carried away and forgetting his duty, I find we do need to forgive Snape as well.
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April 24, 2014, 11:14:13 PM
Reply #3

roonwit

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However, I cannot quite agree on the issue of the Potion. It is Lupin's responsibility to take it at the prescribed times and to make sure not to miss a dose. Now Lupin got carried away when he saw the events unfolding on the map. Snape was actually on his way to Lupin with the potion to remind him to take it. Then he, Snape, got carried away as well when he took a look at the map and forgot about the potion. Now, if we forgive Lupin for getting carried away and forgetting his duty, I find we do need to forgive Snape as well.
I wasn't saying that Lupin wasn't at fault as well, but Snape had the opportunity to rectify Lupin's actions and didn't take it. However, I don't see how Snape could forget about the potion he had just bought to the room, so I think his choice to leave the potion behind was deliberate.
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April 25, 2014, 10:49:45 AM
Reply #4

siena

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I doubt your claim that Snape left the potion behind deliberately very much indeed. You might as well claim that Lupin did deliberately miss his dose. They both got carried away by what they saw on the map. Snape isn't Lupin's babysitter; he made the potion for Lupin but it isn't his responsibility to carry it after him. Lupin is supposed to be a responsible adult.

Snape cared about the trio's safety as he had promised to Dumbledore to help and look after Harry. He would not deliberately leave Harry and the other two at risk running into a werewolf -and last but not least he wouldn't risk endangering himself either.
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April 25, 2014, 07:06:54 PM
Reply #5

roonwit

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I doubt your claim that Snape left the potion behind deliberately very much indeed. You might as well claim that Lupin did deliberately miss his dose. They both got carried away by what they saw on the map. Snape isn't Lupin's babysitter; he made the potion for Lupin but it isn't his responsibility to carry it after him. Lupin is supposed to be a responsible adult.
The difference is that Snape was carrying the potion when he saw the map, so he has a physical reminder. It would be considerably easier for Lupin to forget what day it was.
Snape cared about the trio's safety as he had promised to Dumbledore to help and look after Harry. He would not deliberately leave Harry and the other two at risk running into a werewolf -and last but not least he wouldn't risk endangering himself either.
Snape wouldn't know about the trio at that point. He only sees Lupin on the map running out of sight, and assumes he is going to meet Sirius. The trio, Sirius and Wormtail would be well off the map by then.
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April 26, 2014, 12:15:57 PM
Reply #6

siena

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Snape wouldn't know about the trio at that point. He only sees Lupin on the map running out of sight, and assumes he is going to meet Sirius. The trio, Sirius and Wormtail would be well off the map by then.

Thank you for pointing this out - I was always wondering why he didn't spot Peter on the map, but this explains it.

But something else occurred to me: Lupin only starts transforming the moment the moon appears from behind the clouds. They all knew before they left the Shack that Lupin hadn't taken his potion. Snape was already out of the way knocked out. Why didn't they leave Lupin behind in the Shack  for safety? Wouldn't that have been a much more sensible action? Or why didn't they at least blindfold Lupin so he wouldn't be able to see the moon? Would a blindfold have made a difference? I mean the moon must already have been there, it was just obscured by clouds. so it seems that Lupin needs to see it before he transforms  :lupin:  ?
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April 26, 2014, 03:35:53 PM
Reply #7

ss19

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However, I cannot quite agree on the issue of the Potion. It is Lupin's responsibility to take it at the prescribed times and to make sure not to miss a dose. Now Lupin got carried away when he saw the events unfolding on the map. Snape was actually on his way to Lupin with the potion to remind him to take it. Then he, Snape, got carried away as well when he took a look at the map and forgot about the potion. Now, if we forgive Lupin for getting carried away and forgetting his duty, I find we do need to forgive Snape as well.
I wasn't saying that Lupin wasn't at fault as well, but Snape had the opportunity to rectify Lupin's actions and didn't take it. However, I don't see how Snape could forget about the potion he had just bought to the room, so I think his choice to leave the potion behind was deliberate.

It doesn't make any sense to me that Snape would leave the potion behind deliberately.  What do you suggest was his goal for doing so?  Hoping Lupin would transform?  Snape wanted Sirius captured and handed over to the dementors, and if he thought Lupin might be helping Sirius, why would he want Lupin transformed into a werewolf?  Snape was heading towards where Sirius and Lupin were, and he'd need to subdue the both of them to get Sirius captured.  Wouldn't he be making things more difficult for himself to have to face Lupin the werewolf rather than Lupin the wizard?  He would be risking himself getting bitten or killed.

I personally think it's much more likely that Snape just forgot about the potion in the heat of the moment, like everyone else did.  He probably had to put down the potion he was carrying when he saw the map in order to pick up the map with both hands.  And once he saw what was on the map, he rushed out and forgot about the potion.  As siena pointed out, Snape told the trio and everyone else there that he was bringing Lupin the potion when he saw the map.  So everyone heard him and knew that Lupin hadn't taken the potion that night.  But because of what was happening, nobody remembered about the potion later when they were leaving the Shrieking Shack.
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April 26, 2014, 07:15:49 PM
Reply #8

roonwit

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But something else occurred to me: Lupin only starts transforming the moment the moon appears from behind the clouds. They all knew before they left the Shack that Lupin hadn't taken his potion. Snape was already out of the way knocked out. Why didn't they leave Lupin behind in the Shack  for safety? Wouldn't that have been a much more sensible action? Or why didn't they at least blindfold Lupin so he wouldn't be able to see the moon? Would a blindfold have made a difference? I mean the moon must already have been there, it was just obscured by clouds. so it seems that Lupin needs to see it before he transforms  :lupin:  ?
I assume it was before the night of the full moon, and Lupin will only transform if he is exposed to direct moonlight (perhaps why he has to drink the potion in the lead up to the full moon). At this point I imagine that blocking the moonlight somehow would be enough to stop Lupin transforming, but that can't work all the time or else Lupin could just go down to a windowless room or dungeon and avoid having to transform each month.
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April 27, 2014, 02:49:07 PM
Reply #9

siena

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But it was full moon that night, or not  ???

I still can't believe that no one was thinking of taking any precaution - they had just discussed Lupin's situation at great length, it must have been very fresh in all of their minds, especially in Lupin's himself and in Hermione's, who had spent so much time and energy figuring out Lupin's secret. Harry was preoccupied with Sirius being his true and loyal godfather no doubt, Sirius himself must have been overwhelmed as well,  Ron was probably still in shock about Scabbers and his leg was aching - but Lupin and Hermione?
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