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Author Topic: Chapter Twenty - The Dementor’s Kiss  (Read 735 times)

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April 24, 2014, 09:19:25 PM

JaneMarple9

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Chapter Twenty: The Dementor’s Kiss
(Chap Summary by twiddlethosedials )


Fan Art by Prince Zuzu


It’s a motley bunch that makes its way back out of the Shrieking Shack - Crookshanks in the lead, Sirius paying no mind to Snape’s comfort, Ron hobbling between the Rat and Lupin (isn’t Pettigrew in the middle?), and Harry and Hermione following behind. But as they emerge, the moonlight hits Lupin, who’s transformed - giving Pettigrew his chance to switch back to his ratty self and make his escape. In the confusion, Sirius winds up stuck in his human form and surrounded by Dementors, but Harry and Hermione can’t help. Just as Harry blacks out, he sees a shining creature sent by someone familiar from across the lake. It chases off the Dementors.

A few questions to get you started:
1) Harry barely knows Sirius, but he jumps at the chance to live with him. Is that naive? Or is Harry just a good judge of character?

2) Why is it so hard for Hermione, the brightest witch of her age, to cast the Patronus Charm?

3) We see Snape bouncing along like a puppet held up by strings. Who’s the puppet master? What’s behind the imagery?
« Last Edit: April 25, 2014, 08:08:15 AM by JaneMarple9 »



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April 25, 2014, 07:20:00 PM
Reply #1

roonwit

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1) Harry barely knows Sirius, but he jumps at the chance to live with him. Is that naive? Or is Harry just a good judge of character?
It is a bit naive, but Sirius was his father's best friend and the person his parents wanted to care for Harry if they died. Also, as the alternative is the Dursleys, Sirius must be better by comparison.
2) Why is it so hard for Hermione, the brightest witch of her age, to cast the Patronus Charm?
On this occasion it is simply zero practise, and in a situation much more hostile than Harry had when he learned the spell. More generally, I think Hermione's insecurity makes it difficult for her.
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April 26, 2014, 12:14:01 AM
Reply #2

HealerOne

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1) Harry barely knows Sirius, but he jumps at the chance to live with him. Is that naive? Or is Harry just a good judge of character?
It is a bit naive, but Sirius was his father's best friend and the person his parents wanted to care for Harry if they died. Also, as the alternative is the Dursleys, Sirius must be better by comparison.
I think Harry is so desperate to get out from under the rule of the Dursleys that he would jump at any chance he could get to be rid of them.  :furious: The thought of being with someone who likes him and knew his family before their deaths has to also be a pull to live with Sirius. He can hardly remember when he was a loved and respected member of a family. One thing that the Weasleys have shown him is what it is like to be in a family that does that for each member. Harry doesn't really have a lot of life experience with a loving family, so he is a bit naive thinking that living with Sirius would be like living with the Weasleys.


2) Why is it so hard for Hermione, the brightest witch of her age, to cast the Patronus Charm?
On this occasion it is simply zero practise, and in a situation much more hostile than Harry had when he learned the spell. More generally, I think Hermione's insecurity makes it difficult for her.
I agree that Hermione's insecurities make doing this spell difficult for her, but beyond that - this spell is one which requires faith that something/someone will come to the rescue. Hermione's brain doesn't seem to work like that! She believes that she is in charge. Having faith to "expect a father figure" (God?) to come to the rescue may just be too foreign to her analytical way of thinking. Like her inability to master Divination and believe in something that is not finite, I think she hesitates and has difficulty because she wavers when it comes to believing in the unseen. 


3) We see Snape bouncing along like a puppet held up by strings. Who’s the puppet master? What’s behind the imagery?
Interesting question! Of course we don't understand at this point in the story how DD is masterminding the development of Snape and Harry. I think JKR included this imagery to hint of that which is to come. (Of course she may have just wanted to include a funny image in her writing ...)  :-[
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