September 22, 2018, 07:13:43 AM

Author Topic: Chapter Twenty-One: Hermione’s Secret  (Read 889 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

April 27, 2014, 08:49:25 PM

JaneMarple9

  • Staffer
  • *****
  • Posts: 439
Chapter Twenty-One: Hermione’s Secret
(Chap Summary by twiddlethosedials )


Fan Art by Tom Scribble


Of course, no one believes Harry and Hermione, except Dumbledore, but who’s going to believe a pair of 13-year-old kids? He hints to Hermione that what we need is more time. So she lets Harry in on her little secret - a Time-Turner, which she’s been using to go to her lessons all year. Buckbeak’s not dead after all, because Harry and Hermione save him. It wasn’t Harry’s dad who saved them from the Dementors - it was Harry, who didn’t understand he’d seen himself the first time. They ride Buckbeak to safety and release Sirius, who rides off into the night sky. Confused? Yeah, me too.

A few questions to get you started:
1) Why can’t Harry go back and prevent Snape sneaking up on the Shrieking Shack, or Pettigrew’s escape?

2) Hermione’s got to be the only 13-year-old witch ever to be trusted with a Time-Turner. Did she live up to the trust or betray it?

3) If you had access to a Time-Turner, how would YOU use it, and why?



"There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with a really big library"
Logged
April 28, 2014, 10:47:37 AM
Reply #1

siena

  • *****
  • Posts: 303
We don't know if Hermione was the only pupil trusted with a Time-Turner. Both Percy Weasley and Barty Crouch Junior achieved more OWLs than Hermione, so it is quite possible that they had access to the device at school as well.

I wouldn't say Hermione betrayed the trust placed in her. She tried to keep it secret, although her clipped and evasive answers definately made Ron suspicious. He knew Hermione was harbouring a secret, so I doubt  very much that she would have managed to keep her secret another academic year. However, quite apart from that, Hermione was quite obviously not coping. She missed an important lesson (Charms) due to her confusion and inability to keep track of her different duties and times. She definately failed to live up to expectations - her own and McGonagall's. Hermione has to learn a lot in PoA - and learning her limits is one of those things.
Logged
April 28, 2014, 03:57:27 PM
Reply #2

HealerOne

  • Staffer
  • *****
  • Posts: 914
    • Chasing the Tale
I think it is sad that Hermione and Harry's first hand account of what had happened would not be even listened to by the the Minister of Magic. The premise being that all 13 year olds are liars?  Fudge instead becomes the judge and jury and wants the worst punishment for Sirius. There seems to be no cross check to the power of the Minister which makes him a dictator. No wonder Harry becomes very anti- MoM. DD did listen to Sirius. I am wondering if Snape also listened to the same interview? Or did he just hear part of it?

I would think that hearing that Peter was an animagus would have been enough to set off some light bulbs about the Weasley's pet rat ... But I guess we are led to believe that Snape was just seeing red at the time and just couldn't get past the idea that Lupin had been helping his old pal Sirius - the guy who had engineered a 'prank' that almost got him killed as a teenager. It's hard to tell by the little we know of how James protected Snape, but I wonder if Snape knew that James was an animagus too? If so, then he should have been even more suspicious about the accusation that Peter was one too. Instead he flat out won't even listen to the story - that too me is a character flaw in Snape; He tends to construct a worst case story and sticks with it even though there is evidence that story isn't true. Hmm maybe that is because of being around all those evil gits in the DE and Voldemort crowd...?
Logged
April 28, 2014, 04:27:54 PM
Reply #3

siena

  • *****
  • Posts: 303
DD did listen to Sirius. I am wondering if Snape also listened to the same interview? Or did he just hear part of it?

Snape didn't hear any of it. Dumbledore interviewed Sirius alone. Snape does only question Dumbledore about the interview afterwards in the hospital wing.

I agree that Harry and Hermione should at least have been listened to by a third party. However, there is a lot of evidence against Sirius, and as Dumbledore points out, Sirius has not behaved like an innocent man either. The attack on the fat lady, entering the castle with a knife ... And as Dumbledore also points out, he himself gave evidence that Sirius was Secret Keeper. It really does look very bad for Sirius, with or without Harry's and Hermione's account.
Logged
April 28, 2014, 11:20:20 PM
Reply #4

roonwit

  • *****
  • Posts: 477
1) Why can’t Harry go back and prevent Snape sneaking up on the Shrieking Shack, or Pettigrew’s escape?
Hermione explains how dangerous changing time is, and we see a few times what might have gone wrong if Hermione hadn't stopped Harry trying to change things. I see the past as rather delicate, and if you change the wrong thing it could be disastrous. Also Harry and Hermione have a lot to lose because if they are implicated in trying to help Buckbeak or Sirius escape they could be expelled or prosecuted.
2) Hermione’s got to be the only 13-year-old witch ever to be trusted with a Time-Turner. Did she live up to the trust or betray it?
She kept the trust, concealing that she was using a time turner as successfully as she could, and only using it to try to change things on Dumbledore's instructions.

We don't know if Hermione was the only pupil trusted with a Time-Turner. Both Percy Weasley and Barty Crouch Junior achieved more OWLs than Hermione, so it is quite possible that they had access to the device at school as well.
Given the amount of effort Hermione says McGonagall put in to get the time turner, I think it is very rare, and other ways are generally used to allow students to study 12 OWLs, for example you could imagine Ravenclaws wanting to do 12 OWLs reasonably often, so perhaps Percy had lessons with the Ravenclaws.

I think it is sad that Hermione and Harry's first hand account of what had happened would not be even listened to by the the Minister of Magic. The premise being that all 13 year olds are liars? 
Snape hits on an explanation that invalidates Hermione and Harry's version, because he claims they were confunded (and he might actually believe it). As a result it comes down to which story sounds most plausible, and Snape is believed (probably helped by having a better opportunity to explain it). I suspect that 13-year olds (and 14-year olds as Hermione had had her birthday near the start of the school year), are seen as relatively naive, and not able to understand the adult world fully, and thus, in circumstances like this, have been misled rather than lying deliberately.
Logged
May 02, 2014, 05:05:07 PM
Reply #5

siena

  • *****
  • Posts: 303
I have a question as I was wondering - in real life, would a court accept thirteen year olds as witnesses? Please forgive me if this question is naiv and stupid, but I really don't know  :-[
Logged