April 19, 2018, 06:19:41 PM

Author Topic: Extremely This and Incredibly That  (Read 926 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

September 09, 2014, 11:33:52 PM

paint it Black

  • Notorious Mass Murderer OR Innocent Singing Sensation
  • Forum Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 697
Michiko Kakutani of the New York Times writes that Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close "... contains moments of shattering emotion and stunning virtuosity that attest to Mr. Foer's myriad gifts as a writer."  Would you echo this high praise?  How would you describe this book?  Did you enjoy the experience of reading it, and would you recommend it to others?  Did you find if moving or meaningful?  Did you enjoy getting to know the characters?  Do you have any favorite parts that you'd like to share?




Cuppa is discussing Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman.  Please join us!
Logged
October 04, 2014, 10:47:33 PM
Reply #1

Evreka

  • Quibbling Queen
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1700
    • Try & Trix
It's a very interesting book, with a compelling tale many different layers and life stories in different times, mainly Dresden in the 40's, New York in the 60's (when Oskar's grandparents meet again),  2001 and onwards. Each era, brings its own questions, mysteries and fascination to the tale. So many questions raised, so few answers provided.

I read it on commutes and was almost sad when I reached my destination as I wanted to keep reading...

In the very early chapters I was confused over the format: pictures, letters, all but empty pages, the sudden jumps in time - who was it who talked to the mute man? But once I got in far enough to grasp the story it never stopped to be compelling.

And it is a story that begs to be discussed.  :grouptalk:
Logged
October 21, 2014, 02:37:14 AM
Reply #2

ss19

  • DS's resident Clever Clogs
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 590
I liked the story very much once I got into it.  Like Evreka, I was confused in the beginning with the book jumping between seemingly-unrelated stories and characters.  Once the connection between these stories and characters became clear, I was able to get into the book and really enjoyed it.  I did find the story very moving.  I even cried near the end!

Do you have any favorite parts that you'd like to share?

There were many parts that I liked.  One of my favorites, off the top of my head, is when we found out why Mr. Black stopped going key-searching with Oskar.  When he first stopped and we didn't know why, I was very annoyed that he'd desert Oskar so suddenly like that when Oskar really needed him and when I thought the two had developed a close bond with each other.  Once it was revealed to us that Mr. Black met the grandfather and only gave up these outings with Oskar in order for the grandfather to go instead, I found that very heartwarming and it made me very happy that Mr. Black didn't just desert Oskar after all.  Mr. Black seemed to need Oskar as much as Oskar needed him, and seemed to have enjoyed venturing out into the world again, so it was very selfless of him to give it up for the grandfather.
Logged
October 21, 2014, 08:01:46 PM
Reply #3

Evreka

  • Quibbling Queen
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1700
    • Try & Trix
Do you have any favorite parts that you'd like to share?
There were many parts that I liked.  One of my favorites, off the top of my head, is when we found out why Mr. Black stopped going key-searching with Oskar.  When he first stopped and we didn't know why, I was very annoyed that he'd desert Oskar so suddenly like that when Oskar really needed him and when I thought the two had developed a close bond with each other.  Once it was revealed to us that Mr. Black met the grandfather and only gave up these outings with Oskar in order for the grandfather to go instead, I found that very heartwarming and it made me very happy that Mr. Black didn't just desert Oskar after all.  Mr. Black seemed to need Oskar as much as Oskar needed him, and seemed to have enjoyed venturing out into the world again, so it was very selfless of him to give it up for the grandfather.
I liked that too! What seemed to be such an odd decision, after all, suddenly became such an act of selflessness.  :hug: Making room for the grand-father who just tug along to keep him protected also.

I, too, have many favourite parts:
Oscar's letter to his French teacher had me laughing out loud, and I was sure at the time that he'd be caught as the sender of it.

We learn quite early that Oscar goes back to dig up his father's coffin, which even when you know it's empty still is a bit ewww...  :yuck: And then, when you reach that point in the story and you learn what they did with it, it becomes a sort of closure. If they absolutely had to do this... well it sort of gives room to light coming after. Burying all those unread letters makes some kind of sense, after all.

And I also like, how in the end, Oscar makes the man look like he's floating UP in the sky by reversing the order of the pictures. Again, it feels like some kind of closure coming to Oscar, which he really needs.  :console:
Logged
November 07, 2014, 06:19:45 PM
Reply #4

paint it Black

  • Notorious Mass Murderer OR Innocent Singing Sensation
  • Forum Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 697
I, too, have many favourite parts:
Oscar's letter to his French teacher had me laughing out loud, and I was sure at the time that he'd be caught as the sender of it.

I'm not so sure that he wasn't caught, and that the French teacher might have contacted Mrs. Schell, who concluded that Oskar did not need the added stress of French lessons at this point in his life.

And I also like, how in the end, Oscar makes the man look like he's floating UP in the sky by reversing the order of the pictures. Again, it feels like some kind of closure coming to Oscar, which he really needs.  :console:

I liked that as well; I've commented on it more here.

Cuppa is discussing Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman.  Please join us!
Logged
November 07, 2014, 09:25:46 PM
Reply #5

Evreka

  • Quibbling Queen
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1700
    • Try & Trix
I, too, have many favourite parts:
Oscar's letter to his French teacher had me laughing out loud, and I was sure at the time that he'd be caught as the sender of it.
I'm not so sure that he wasn't caught, and that the French teacher might have contacted Mrs. Schell, who concluded that Oskar did not need the added stress of French lessons at this point in his life.
That's absolutely a possibility, as we realise somewhere at the end how much his mother knew of his excursions. So it makes sense she wouldn't make a big deal about it and that's why we readers never hear about it again. But you have to read almost to the end before you know that she is aware of his trips.
Logged