July 21, 2018, 06:42:40 PM

Author Topic: September 11, 2001  (Read 925 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

September 09, 2014, 11:41:39 PM

paint it Black

  • Notorious Mass Murderer OR Innocent Singing Sensation
  • Forum Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 697
Depending on the place and era in which you were born, there are iconic events that are likely to be bookmarked in your memory: the day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated; the day astronauts first landed on the moon; and September 11, 2001.  On that day, terrorists hijacked four jet planes, flying two into the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City, one into the Pentagon building in Washington DC, and crashing one into a Pennsylvania field, with a total death toll of nearly three thousand  people.  Do you remember where you were and what you were doing when you heard this news?

Like Oskar Schell, for some this tragedy was more deeply felt.  Did you or someone you know suffer a personal, life-changing tragedy that day?

Have you ever visited Ground Zero or any of the memorials erected to commemorate the tragedy?

In the United States, September 11 is now observed each year as Patriot's Day.  Do you do anything special to observe this day?

Do the events of 9/11 continue to impact your life today?



Cuppa is discussing Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman.  Please join us!
Logged
September 11, 2014, 06:24:05 PM
Reply #1

ss19

  • DS's resident Clever Clogs
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 590
Do you remember where you were and what you were doing when you heard this news?

I remember exactly where I was and what I was doing when I heard the news.  I had been home with a newborn baby, and that morning I had to bring him back to the birth center for a medical procedure and I was very stressed about it.  I was in the car with the baby on the way to the birth center when I heard the news on the radio.  It didn't completely register because of the state that I was in.  But when I got to the birth center, I quickly realized what just happened.  They had the TV on in the waiting area, and everyone was watching the news and in shock.  The nurse who was taking care of us during the appointment was very distracted because she had a nephew who was working in one of the twin towers and she didn't know yet whether he was OK.  It certainly put everything into perspective.  All of a sudden it seemed like my son's medical procedure was a very stupid thing for me to be stressed about.


In the United States, September 11 is now observed each year as Patriot's Day.  Do you do anything special to observe this day?

I had to look it up when I saw this to see if you were making it up, paint it Black. (Sorry!)  :-[

Having lived in Massachusetts for several years where Patriots' Day has long been a holiday in April commemorating the first battles of the American Revolutionary War which took place in Massachusetts in 1775, I still think of Patriots' Day as being in April.  I wasn't aware that 9/11 is also referred to as Patriots' Day.  Everyone around me usually just says 9/11.

Anyway, sometimes we have a community or school event for 9/11 that we'll participate in.  This year I haven't heard of anything going on.  I did put out my American flag in the front of the house this morning.


Do the events of 9/11 continue to impact your life today?

I think the biggest impact besides a general feeling of vulnerability is air travel.  Security procedures at airports are a lot more complicated than they were before 9/11.

Over the summer when I was traveling, at one of the airports I went through, I was flagged and pulled out of the security line and taken to the side.  A security officer came over and started running a device all over my hands.  I didn't know what was going on so I asked him what he was looking for, and he said traces of explosives.  Apparently they choose some passengers randomly to do this extra check.

All these security measures slow us down when we travel, but after what happened on 9/11, I think most of us don't mind the extra time and hassle to ensure it doesn't happen again.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2014, 06:26:21 PM by ss19 »
Logged
September 11, 2014, 07:52:55 PM
Reply #2

Evreka

  • Quibbling Queen
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1700
    • Try & Trix
You might think that for someone living on the other side of Earth, literally, this wouldn't be a day that stood out in their memories - yet it is. If I remember correctly the twin towers were hit mid-morning somewhere around 9 AM in local time, I think? That is six hours behind my time zone, so this information spread in my country sometime in the afternoon. I remember that evening and the following days quite clearly despite all the intervening years.

Prior to Internet, I do not think I was much affected by things that happened so far away, but with Internet came the communities and with the communities came the online ties to people all over the world.... Somewhere around -97 I think, I joined my first Internet community: Sixdegrees. I spent a huge amount of time on there, and got involved in a very lively group, which had enough strong bonds to stubbornly stick together in a yahoo group (or similar) after sixdegrees Vannished somewhere in 1999/2000. By September 2001 our little group was nowhere near as active as we once were, but it was still keeping together.

On September 11th, 2001, I was at University studying late at night trying to get a computer program to work, and I think I ended up getting on the Underground roughly around 9 PM. It was the most eerie trip I have ever made... It wasn't much people around, but every group of at least two people who travelled that night mentioned something terrible, horrendous, beyond words that had occured... I was not comfortable approaching strangers and ask what they referred to so I had no idea of either the scope, what kind of tragedy or even if it was something that had happened in my city, my country or elsewhere!  :o

Once home, my parents told me about the planes in the twin towers and I felt my world "tilt" a little. Partly for the pure evil involved, and the thought of the victims both trapped on the planes and those on the ground; but also I instantly became worried about my online friends, whereof most were Americans and with few exceptions I had no idea of where in the US they lived.

I remember seeing the planes hit the towers on our TV news  :o and going online for more info. The news sites hardly loaded at all when everyone with a computer wanted info at the same time. So instead I logged into my group and felt utter relief for every friend that came online, for every one who could report that their family was OK too. I remember one woman whose mother had been flying that day, who couldn't get in topuch with her. I think it took a day (maybe longer) before she finally had confirmation that her plane had been forced to land at some far-away location and she was stranded there, but all right. We were all happy to hear that... 

I think this was probably the first time I realised how strong bonds you can sometimes get to online friends too... I don't know if any of you have read Melissa Annelli's Harry: A History, but in some early chapter of that book, she talks about 9/11 and her need to go online and share the horrible wait to find out if her sister was OK, with a group of online friends. I had the exact same need, even this far away and with all family safe, to reach out to other people and hear that the American friends I cared about was all safe. I think that the group as a whole (ie also the Americans) got some strength simply by reaching out to the groups of people that meant something. A real life event where caring and love became the best antidote we could find against pure evil...


(The memory of this day is strong enough for me to feel compelled to reply in here now, despite not really having the time tonight...)


Like ss19, I suppose the travel restrictions, airplane controls and quite a few Law changes that went through in Europe after this terrible event, targeted at anti terrorism, are the most tangible impacts today, at least in my part of Europe.

The terror of that day, which engaged so many people worldwide, is one I am not likely to ever forget. Also  the realisation of just how much Internet can bond people together even over great distances and various cultures - if we let it - is also one I have never forgotten.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2014, 08:08:43 PM by Evreka »
Logged
September 11, 2014, 09:20:45 PM
Reply #3

RiverSpirit

  • You can count on me!
  • Forum Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 554
  • Maroon to the Bone
I was on a holiday in apartment overlooking the ocean on the other side of the world with my husband and my almost three year old. This was a break for us to relax following months of major health problems and numerous surgeries that I had endured including the loss of my second child at birth.

The news broke here in the middle of the night. When I woke in the morning, I was reading a Clive Cussler novel, I don't remember the name. I had just read a chapter where a small plane is flown through New York weaving its way through the skyscrapers.

My husband, who was up early, came to tell me what had happened. Having read what I had just read it took me a while to register. I went to the TV and sat horrified as I watched. It was difficult to believe.

Even though I truly was half a world away I felt that I was there, right with the people involved, crying for those who were desperately searching. I watch my students learning about 9/11 today and wonder if they could ever comprehend the enormity of it.
  
Logged
September 12, 2014, 03:36:43 PM
Reply #4

paint it Black

  • Notorious Mass Murderer OR Innocent Singing Sensation
  • Forum Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 697
Do you remember where you were and what you were doing when you heard this news?

I remember exactly where I was and what I was doing when I heard the news.  I had been home with a newborn baby, and that morning I had to bring him back to the birth center for a medical procedure and I was very stressed about it.....

Wow, small world ss19, I also had a medical appointment for my very small child that morning.  Before we left for the doctor's office, I sat down at the computer with a bite to eat, clicked on the news, and saw a massive photo of the towers on fire.  It took a few minutes to realize that it was more than just a fire.  Then the story progressed and the first tower fell.  Just unreal.

We called the doctor's office wondering if the appointment would be cancelled; it seemed like our country was under attack, so we didn't know just how or if our everyday lives would change for that day.  The appointment was on, though.


In the United States, September 11 is now observed each year as Patriot's Day.  Do you do anything special to observe this day?

I had to look it up when I saw this to see if you were making it up, paint it Black. (Sorry!)  :-[

 ;D Yeah, I don't hear anyone ever call it that either to be honest, but it is written that way on some of my calendars.  It is not an official national holiday.  I also mostly hear people say "9/11" or sometimes "September 11th".


..... also I instantly became worried about my online friends, whereof most were Americans and with few exceptions I had no idea of where in the US they lived.

I remember seeing the planes hit the towers on our TV news  :o and going online for more info. The news sites hardly loaded at all when everyone with a computer wanted info at the same time. So instead I logged into my group and felt utter relief for every friend that came online, for every one who could report that their family was OK too. I remember one woman whose mother had been flying that day, who couldn't get in topuch with her. I think it took a day (maybe longer) before she finally had confirmation that her plane had been forced to land at some far-away location and she was stranded there, but all right. We were all happy to hear that... 

I also felt the need to touch bases with friends and family, even though I was pretty sure they were not involved directly, simply because a tragedy on such a large scale tends to unite us.  Mostly I wanted to contact a friend that I had been out of touch with for a few years, but I knew she worked for the federal government and was often posted overseas, though I feared that maybe she worked in the Pentagon.  (It turns out that she was in Berlin on that day.)

I have a distant relative who was a NYC firefighter, and though he was not working that day, I'm sure every day thereafter was forever changed for him.  I have a close relative who works in aviation, and had he been working that day, he would have been involved in assisting with the safe landing of every commercial and private airplane in the nation (which was how the mother of Evreka's friend became stranded).  Every day thereafter was also changed for him, in terms of his job.  I think it was two or three days before they let regular air traffic resume, and all kinds of safety rules and regulations have changed since then, as many of us have experienced.


Over the summer when I was traveling, at one of the airports I went through, I was flagged and pulled out of the security line and taken to the side.  A security officer came over and started running a device all over my hands.  I didn't know what was going on so I asked him what he was looking for, and he said traces of explosives.  Apparently they choose some passengers randomly to do this extra check.

All these security measures slow us down when we travel, but after what happened on 9/11, I think most of us don't mind the extra time and hassle to ensure it doesn't happen again.

Yeah, I've had that hand thing done to me as well, and they even did it to my child once.  I agree though that I don't mind jumping through these hoops if it makes it easier for the people who are trying to keep us safe to do their jobs.

I don't have any friends or family currently serving in the military, but I'll bet every one of their lives have changed as well.  Suddenly their duty went from not just keeping our country safe, but protecting us from potential catastrophic surprise terrorist attacks, both here and overseas.  The focus of the military for all of the US allies has likely changed as well.  It's a new world out there.

One of my little one's favorite bedtime books at the time of the attacks was about airplanes.  That was a really tough read for me that night.  See the airplane.  See all the people inside.  See it soar through the sky.  My first impressions of horror about the whole thing were for the poor people in the airplanes, who had to have known something terrible was happening when they started flying low into NYC.  Just last year I made a day trip into the city, the first time I'd been there in many years.  It was a crisp clear fall morning, and I succumbed to the touristy urge to look up at all the very tall buildings.  Just then an airplane flew by, and the image of this momentarily struck me right in the gut.  If I could have this kind of reaction after 12 years had passed, it must have taken ages for the residents of NYC to get used to the once ordinary sight of an airplane flying over their city again.

Cuppa is discussing Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman.  Please join us!
Logged
September 12, 2014, 06:12:50 PM
Reply #5

HealerOne

  • Staffer
  • *****
  • Posts: 914
    • Chasing the Tale
Remembering 9/11 is very difficult. Even now I have a very hard time watching TV specials about the event. I remember I was driving to work, and not being one to have the news station on as I drove, I was surprised at the erratic driving that I saw that morning. When I arrived and one of the other therapists told me what happened I couldn't believe it. Once the second tower was hit - we were sure that this was a planned attack. My heart went out to one of our staff who had recently joined the medical unit of the Army National Guard. She was a single mother. We all were aware she could be called to action at any moment. Like others, my thoughts went to people that I knew that might be in the air or were in NYC. It was hard carrying on when all of this was on our plate, but what else could we do? These terrorists couldn't crush us all? Our patients needed us, too. So we went on. At noon we rigged up a TV we used for Video games so we could see the news. We were all aghast and by this time the towers had collapsed. It was almost too much when we heard about The Pentagon. By then, too, all air traffic was ordered to the ground. That was by far the strangest part of it - when you would go outside and not see or hear  airplanes in the air at all. It was eery.

I cannot not think of 9/11 and not think of what, in hindsight, was important clues to me. First of all Embry-Riddle Flight School, which is just on the coast not more than 60 miles or so from my home, was in the news more than once for planes that crashed into the sea on more than one occasion. The student pilots who were killed had Arabic sounding names. It seemed strange that there were all these crashes happening.  (We later learned that some of the pilots involved in the take-overs of the planes had trained at Embry-Riddle.)

Now here is the really strange part. For months leading up to 9/11, whenever I would drive up to the building I worked at, I would have a  vision flash in front of me of a plane running into that building. It was a re-occurring vision which I would shake my head about and wonder why on earth I would have such a vision. That obviously stopped after 9/11.

That was a day of horror when too many innocent people and brave heroes died. But it didn't destroy The USA, perhaps some innocence was destroyed but not the nation.

I have thought more than once of what Snape said in his DADA class in HBP: "The Dark Arts ... Are many, varied, ever-changing and eternal. Fighting them is like fighting a many-headed monster, which each time a neck is severed, sprouts a head even fiercer and cleverer than before. You are fighting that which is unfixed, mutating, indestructible."
Logged
September 12, 2014, 10:12:52 PM
Reply #6

Evreka

  • Quibbling Queen
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1700
    • Try & Trix
I was on a holiday in apartment overlooking the ocean on the other side of the world with my husband and my almost three year old. This was a break for us to relax following months of major health problems and numerous surgeries that I had endured including the loss of my second child at birth.

Of all backdrops for the news to hit at!  :( :console:


I have a close relative who works in aviation, and had he been working that day, he would have been involved in assisting with the safe landing of every commercial and private airplane in the nation (which was how the mother of Evreka's friend became stranded).  Every day thereafter was also changed for him, in terms of his job.  I think it was two or three days before they let regular air traffic resume, and all kinds of safety rules and regulations have changed since then, as many of us have experienced.

...  Just last year I made a day trip into the city, the first time I'd been there in many years.  It was a crisp clear fall morning, and I succumbed to the touristy urge to look up at all the very tall buildings.  Just then an airplane flew by, and the image of this momentarily struck me right in the gut.  If I could have this kind of reaction after 12 years had passed, it must have taken ages for the residents of NYC to get used to the once ordinary sight of an airplane flying over their city again.
One of the persons in my online group of friends, lived very close to a huge airport, somewhere in the middle of the US (I've forgotten where exactly). Normally he had planes going right over his house as planes came in to land or after take-off, all the time, around the clock. Following the ban of all non-military airplanes after the attacks; when every plane had landed, for the first time ever, it was silent around his house.

I remember a post by him one of the nearest days after, while the ban was still in effect. He'd heard an airplane in the air, and he and his wife had rushed to the windows to look out. It was a military plane. He commented it something along the lines of: If someone had told me a week ago, that I would go to the window because I heard a plane outside, I'd thought they were mental... All of a sudden, it was a very strange situation.

« Last Edit: September 12, 2014, 10:22:33 PM by Evreka »
Logged