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Author Topic: Chapter Thirty: The Pensieve  (Read 371 times)

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December 05, 2014, 02:21:15 AM

HealerOne

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Chapter Thirty: The Pensieve
(Chap Summary by twiddlethosedials )


The Pensieve by B-Dub33

Harry's back in Dumbledore's office, where he's asked to wait while Fudge and Moody go with the Headmaster to inspect the grounds. Of course he can't help but indulge his curiosity about that shimmery light... and he falls right into what seems like a circular courtroom. He witnesses the testimony of Karkaroff, then that of Bagman, and finally that of Barty Crouch, Jr., who gets lifetime in Azkaban. Just in time, Dumbledore (the real one) arrives to rescue Harry and explain what he's just seen, and Harry is able to tell him about the dream.

A few questions to get you started:
1) Dumbledore isn't mad at Harry for snooping in his office. Why not?

2) The Pensieve records a number of things Dumbledore couldn't have seen the first time - notably, Moody's expression behind Dumbledore's back, and the way the room looked when entered (as Harry did) from the ceiling. How do you think a Pensieve works?

3) Why is Crouch, Sr., allowed to preside over the trial of his own son? What do you learn about the way the wizarding courts work from this chapter?


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December 05, 2014, 08:58:39 PM
Reply #1

roonwit

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1) Dumbledore isn't mad at Harry for snooping in his office. Why not?
Dumbledore doesn't seem the sort of person to get angry at innocent curiosity, and the memories Harry views aren't something Dumbledore would be bothered about keeping private - the only thing he might have preferred that Harry didn't find out was that Neville's parents were the victims in the last trial, though Harry treats the information with the sensitivity it deserves.
2) The Pensieve records a number of things Dumbledore couldn't have seen the first time - notably, Moody's expression behind Dumbledore's back, and the way the room looked when entered (as Harry did) from the ceiling. How do you think a Pensieve works?
I think it reconstructs the surrounding events from everything the person, whose memory it is, is aware of. That could include reflections, changes in breathing, or slight sounds of movement. That includes what things look like from different angles.
3) Why is Crouch, Sr., allowed to preside over the trial of his own son? What do you learn about the way the wizarding courts work from this chapter?
It is rather irregular that not only is Crouch allowed to preside over the trial of his son, but his wife is allowed to sit beside him. It seems in the wizarding world that people in power can bend rules to suit themselves. It also seemed to me that the jury pays too much attention to Bagman's sporting abilities in clearing him.
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December 22, 2014, 12:21:51 AM
Reply #2

ginginkat

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I agree with Roonwit that Professor Dumbledore could not be angry with Harry's explorations.  Dumbledore knew even in Harry's fourth year that the boy wizard was to be an important part in fighting Voldemort.  The more knowledge that Harry accumulated, the better his chances in defeating the Dark Lord.  If Professor Dumbledore was worried about Harry's snooping, it would be that Harry might learn something too soon and not understand the meaning or consequences.   

He was not bothered by the knowledge learned through the Pensieve but did feel that Harry might not be mature enough to keep Neville's secret.  However, the little nudge was all that Harry needed to keep quiet about the Longbottoms' fate at the hands of the Death Eaters.
 
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December 23, 2014, 02:04:44 AM
Reply #3

HealerOne

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2) The Pensieve records a number of things Dumbledore couldn't have seen the first time - notably, Moody's expression behind Dumbledore's back, and the way the room looked when entered (as Harry did) from the ceiling. How do you think a Pensieve works?
The Pensieve seems to be an all seeing eye - taking in all the angles of what is happening in the scenes that the 'beholder' isn't aware of at the time.  Indeed in Pottermore, JKR has indicated that it recreates memories "taking in every every detail stored in the subconscious and recreating it faithfully ... " It must be extremely advanced magic to allow this kind of detail to be stored and played back without the taint of bias that the 'memory donor' has. It must take a lot of honesty and strength to be the person that had the memory to watch it from that perspective.
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