July 21, 2018, 06:33:11 PM

Author Topic: Magical Congress of the United States of America  (Read 498 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

November 07, 2016, 09:58:14 AM

Rudius Hagrid

  • Keeper of the Keys
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 96
    • The Discussion Station
This organisation seems to be significant to the plot of the movie; movie posters showing Newt in the Woolworth building at various times of day and the poster we are using as our background for the forum while we celebrate the new movie.

This thread will be a place to discuss American Magical politics (please non-mag politics to be limited to only relevant to the movie) and topics around that theme.

To start us off I would like to point to the Seal and stars and stripes on our background and point out there are 48 stars in the seal and in the two triangles.  In the 1920's the US only had 48 states (Alaska and Hawaii joining later).  Do you think the two territories will feature in the movie at all?


:hagrid: Welcome to the Discussion Station!! :hagrid:
Logged
November 08, 2016, 08:31:24 AM
Reply #1

atschpe

  • April's Fool
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 490
Thanks for point that out with the stars on the seal. For one I would say they are being historically correct to keep things in the era they are setting it, but if Rowling is writing this in anyway like the Potter books, I could really see her mixing the wizarding world into historic events again. A territory such as Alaska is definitely a place to find some fantastic beasts, with it vast expanses with little to no population. Hawaii holds the other side of the balance, being in a very different climate and will in turn offer some very different beasts to discover. No wonder Newt decided to visit and explore. It is going to be interesting to see how the storyline uses this, whether marginally or more center stage.
"Of course it is all in your head, but why on Earth should that mean it isn't real?" ~Dumbledore (DH)
Logged
November 19, 2016, 05:07:44 AM
Reply #2

wordsaremagic

  • The Only Wizard Bob the Duck Ever Feard
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 184
     One of the things that I noticed is that legal relationships between American wizards and non-magical people seem far, far worse than relationships between American Wizards and American Goblins. American Wizards and Goblins drink together and socialize together, but a no-maj is not even allowed to know the existence of the wizarding world; whereas British Wizards and Goblins seem to have a very uneasy relationship but a good many Muggles (like Hermione's parents and even the Dursleys) are aware of the existence of wizards.
I find myself wishing I knew more about how the MCUSA members are elected or appointed and how the President of MCUSA (Seraphina Picquery) attains the status as President. Is she President of the Magical Congress (appointed by fellow members?) or President of the Magical Community (elected by some means external to that congress, like popular vote)?
I also noticed that the right to assign punishment (specifically the death penalty) seems to be given to someone in an executive position (Percy Graves) rather than a person in a judicial position. To that degree, the Magical legal system of America differs greatly from the American no-maj (muggle) system in which punishments are established by the legislature and assigned by a judge. Apparently neither the American nor British Wizarding system is enamored with straight democratic systems of majority rule.
 
Logged
December 11, 2016, 06:17:55 PM
Reply #3

atschpe

  • April's Fool
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 490
Good point,wordsaremagic. I do wonder though, whether the UK in the early 20 th century could show some similarities. Harry's stroy is several decades later, and just like our politics and cultural conventions having changed, there might have been a global shift in magical politics. Yes, Newt mentioned the UK system in a way, giving the feel that it is not as extreme as what he/we encounter in the US. But I would be careful to think it is exactly as we know it from Harry's story. Afterall this is the pre-II-war era, where people such as Hitler or Grindelwald ride on the coat-tails of the ideal so purity. Could British purebloods be striving, pushing or even leading the British Wizengamot to being more seclusive?

I also wonder whether the magical society in the US is smaller in comparison than in the UK. The strive to stay totally separate, gives a feeling that they are not so many as that they would constantly have to monitor living side-by-side. Of ocurse, there is also the fact that the US is much bigger and might allow for many full-magical communities, well away from Muggle – sorry NoMaj – which could make it more "natural" to keep things separate.
"Of course it is all in your head, but why on Earth should that mean it isn't real?" ~Dumbledore (DH)
Logged
December 12, 2016, 03:30:32 PM
Reply #4

HealerOne

  • Staffer
  • *****
  • Posts: 914
    • Chasing the Tale
You have a good point, atschpe. The MCUSA is trying to govern a very widely diverse and spread out community vs the British system that is managing a much  smaller area. Also because of the Salem Witch Trials, the magical community has chosen to bury itself deep into secrecy. I assume that the Goblins have aligned themselves with the magical community and therefore have not the long history of contention that exists in Britain. They are, however, as we see in the movie, consigned to the dregs of the magical community. One wonders about House-elves,  Hags, and, giants - what their status is in this USA community. The whole of the American Magical society appears to be quite secret and attempts to keep themselves separate from No-Maj society. However, there also is an attempt to live in 'plain sight'. One wonders how long that can continue? Also there does not seem to be any attempt to work with the American President as is the case in Britain. Again how long can that continue with out grave danger to the Magical folks?
Logged